Category "BBG"

4May

‘They failed me’: High-profile Mountie walks away from B.C. RCMP after struggles with PTSD

by admin

VANCOUVER —
A high-profile Mountie is walking away from the RCMP after what she calls “unforgivable” neglect from the institution.

Staff Sgt. Jennifer Pound was the face of Integrated Homicide Investigation Team for years, a role that eventually left her suffering with post-traumatic stress disorder.

After years of struggle, she has decided to retire early, saying she could no longer in good conscience, represent the organization.

Deep roots in the RCMP

Pound says she knew she wanted to be a police officer when she was 15, following in her father’s footsteps.

“He really did enjoy his work and came home and raved about how much he loved working every day,” she told CTV News Vancouver. “So, I kind of wanted to mimic that and have a career that you know, felt a part of a family to and really enjoy the camaraderie and a sense of purpose.”

Her brother, husband and many other family members also became members.

At 23, Pound began her career in the University detachment, before heading to North Vancouver.

“I went on to a legal gaming section, the missing women unit and then the Richmond detachment is where I really started to get into the media component of policing,” said Pound.

A slow burn

After years of commitment, Pound was brought onto the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team where she was promoted twice, eventually becoming a staff sergeant.

“People that want to go there want to see justice and they want to see people held accountable for the most horrific crime that you can encounter,” she explained.

As the unit’s spokesperson she worked closely with the families of victims, shouldering the burden of some of the province’s most brutal murders in a very public way.

She believes those interactions triggered the initial symptoms of PTSD.

“On camera, I can be stoic, and I can be whoever I need to be to get that message across. But at the end of the day, I’m walking in my own door to go home. And my family’s not getting the best of me.”

She began experiencing what she described as flu-like symptoms that she couldn’t seem to shake.

“Thankfully, it manifested itself physically or I don’t really know when I would have stopped to take a break and get myself well,” she said.

She was forced to seek medical attention and was put on a two-week medical leave.

“It was just slipping more into an abyss of illness and not being able to get out of bed and hitting just a really, really deep, dark depression within those two weeks,” she told CTV News.

Seeking treatment

Pound was diagnosed with PTSD by her family doctor and was put on another three-month leave.

“The crucial time for in my opinion for the RCMP to get involved with individuals that are off work are from the very, very initial stages,” she said. “You can’t have your people off work sick and not be checking in on them and not at least be acknowledging that you play a role in their recovery.”

She says her direct supervisors were supportive, but RCMP health services was not.

“The very first call that I received from the RCMP was from the graduated return to work people to say, ‘When are you going to get back to work?’ Which is really, really damaging when an individual is trying to figure out what’s wrong with them,” Pound said.

She says that call only exasperated the guilt and shame she was already feeling.

On top of that, she was faced with a six-month waitlist to see a psychologist.

“There’s a real pressure to get members back on the road. And that pressure can be dangerous when you’re dealing with first responders and policing you don’t want sick members on the road.”

It ended up taking her more than a year to see a psychologist that had experience working with first responders.

“What I needed is some from somebody health services to go, ‘Here’s the process. Here’s what you can expect,’ and offer up some psychologists, some doctors, something tangible and helpful for me to move forward in my healing process,” she explained.

RCMP health services

National Headquarters says RCMP health services operates through three programs:

  • Occupational health: which assesses an officer’s fitness to perform law enforcement duties.
  • Disability management and accommodation: which recommends limitations or restrictions to ill or injured members.
  • Health benefits: which determines whether illness or injuries are work-related.

“When you describe yourself as a health services unit, there’s an expectation from the members that they’re going to help you get healthy,” Pound said.

The RCMP says its members are covered for basic health care under provincial/territorial health care plans.

“The health and safety of our members is a top priority for the RCMP and is essential to public safety,” said the RCMP in a statement to CTV News.

“Although, we can’t comment on specific cases, we take work-related stress and mental health issues very seriously and are committed to enhancing the health, safety and resiliency of all our employees. Our work on mental health will never be done.”

Pound says the institution needs to play a bigger role in securing mental health support in a timely manner.

“Health services within the RCMP are ineffective,” she said.

“They failed me right out of the gate.”

‘Stay on the Line’

Pound has been blogging about her struggles with PTSD through a blog called “Stay on the Line,” referencing what 911 dispatchers often tell people in crisis before help is on the way.

She says she’s been inundated with responses from other first responders who have faced similar challenges accessing care.

Going forward she hopes to use the platform to let people with PTSD know they are not alone.

She says the decision to take an early retirement wasn’t an easy one, as she still had many things she wanted to accomplish in policing.

“I knew I couldn’t go back and feel good about myself and feel good about myself for working for an organization that I knew had forgotten me as soon as I stepped out the door.” 

This is part one of a three-part series. Check back for more this week.

1May

‘Targeted shooting’ in parking lot at shopping centre in North Delta

by admin

VANCOUVER —
Police say they are investigating after a man was shot in a parking lot at a shopping centre in North Delta near the Surrey border Saturday afternoon.

The shooting happened shortly before 5 p.m. at Scottsdale Centre near the intersection of Scott Road and 72 Avenue, according to a news release from the Delta Police Department.

When officers arrived at the scene, they found a man who had been shot, police said, adding that they “are not in a position to confirm the identity of the victim or comment on his medical condition.”

“Right now, the initial evidence is indicating that this was a targeted shooting,” said Insp. Guy Leeson, DPD’s head of investigative services, in the release.

“Officers have been interviewing witnesses in the area, and we are also in possession of video that appears to have been filmed immediately after the incident,” Leeson said. “However, anyone who hasn’t yet spoken to police and was a witness (or) has dash cam or CCTV video, is asked to please call 604-946-4411.”

Leeson also acknowledged the “very public” nature of the shooting, saying police are “very much aware” of the risk to innocent bystanders.

“Fortunately it doesn’t appear there was anyone else injured during this incident,” he said.

Sujay Nazareth was inside the Walmart at Scottsdale Centre when he began hearing from staff and other customers that shots had been fired in the parking lot. He told CTV News he was initially skeptical, thinking there are lots of noises that can sound like gunshots.

Soon, though, he heard an announcement over the loudspeaker at Walmart, saying that the store was being locked down and asking people to remain calm.

Nazareth said customers in the store were initially not allowed to leave, as they watched police gather in the parking lot and put up yellow tape around the scene.

Eventually, people were allowed to leave through the shopping mall, but not through the direct exit to the parking lot, Nazareth said.

He said he lives nearby, but drove to the store Saturday afternoon. He left his car in the parking lot and walked home because it was unclear when people might be allowed to leave the Walmart and go back to their vehicles. 

1May

Fatal shooting in North Delta shopping centre parking lot was targeted, say police

by admin

VANCOUVER —
Police are investigating after a man was shot and killed in a parking lot at a shopping centre in North Delta near Surrey on Saturday afternoon.

The shooting happened shortly before 5 p.m. on Saturday at Scottsdale Centre near the intersection of Scott Road and 72 Avenue, according to a news release from the Delta Police Department.

When officers arrived at the scene, they found a man who was in critical condition.

“Despite the best efforts of Emergency Health Services, unfortunately the victim in this incident did pass away,” said Inspector Guy Leeson, head of Investigative Services at Delta Police, in a news statement.

“Right now, the initial evidence is indicating that this was a targeted shooting,” he added.

“Officers have been interviewing witnesses in the area, and we are also in possession of video that appears to have been filmed immediately after the incident,” Leeson said. “However, anyone who hasn’t yet spoken to police and was a witness (or) has dash cam or CCTV video, is asked to please call 604-946-4411.”

Leeson also acknowledged the “very public” nature of the shooting, saying police are “very much aware” of the risk to innocent bystanders.

“Fortunately it doesn’t appear there was anyone else injured during this incident,” he said.

Sujay Nazareth was inside the Walmart at Scottsdale Centre when he began hearing from staff and other customers that shots had been fired in the parking lot. He told CTV News he was initially skeptical, thinking there are lots of noises that can sound like gunshots.

Soon, though, he heard an announcement over the loudspeaker at Walmart, saying that the store was being locked down and asking people to remain calm.

Nazareth said customers in the store were initially not allowed to leave, as they watched police gather in the parking lot and put up yellow tape around the scene.

Eventually, people were allowed to leave the Walmart through the shopping mall, but not through the direct exit to the parking lot, Nazareth said. Many peoples’ cars were behind police tape and they weren’t allowed to access their vehicles.

Nazareth, who lives nearby, said he walked home instead.

On Sunday morning, Delta police said in a statement that they had removed some of the crime tape, allowing many people to access their cars.

“Access to most cars caught in this crime scene is now available. Some cars remain behind crime scene tape and are not accessible,” reads a Delta Police Department tweet.

30Apr

Woman with heart condition verbally accosted in Parksville over disabled parking stall – Vancouver Island Free Daily

by admin

Not judging someone based on their appearance is a lesson commonly taught to children – and one a Parksville woman wants members of the community to remember.

On Wednesday (April 28) Kim Cooper, 53, pulled into a designated disability stall at a Parksville parking lot when a woman began to aggressively yell at her.

“I wasn’t even completely parked, my sign was on my dash where it always is. And I opened my door and said ‘are you yelling at me?’ And she said ‘yes, where’s your handicap sign?’ And I went ‘it’s on my dash.’ And she just kept going on and on and on.”

Cooper survived a heart attack approximately 10 years ago and has lived with congestive heart failure ever since, a chronic and progressive condition that affects the pumping power of her heart. Living with such a condition can leave her winded while walking long distances, which can stress her heart and further exacerbate her condition.

Due to the nature of her condition, she has a disabled parking permit that allows her to park in the designated stalls near a building’s entrance.

“I was going to the dry cleaners, and she’s complaining about me in Bosley’s, and I went to open the door at the dry cleaners and she attacked me again.”

While still visibly distraught, the co-owner of Bosley’s by Pet Valu, Brianne Carson, approached Cooper and offered to walk her back to her vehicle.

“And I just burst into tears. She probably spent 35 minutes with me. I mean, I was just shaking,” said Cooper. “And it’s not right. I think we need to address the situation that ‘hey, not everybody has a visible handicap’.”

“To judge someone based on what we see is something we teach our children not to do, so as adults we shouldn’t be doing that either,” said Carson.

The chair for the Accessible Oceanside Association, Sandra Hobson, said while experiences like Cooper’s are uncommon, they are not unheard of.

“There are certainly instances where somebody who has a has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or a heart condition – they may not be able to walk the length of the parking lot. And they need those accessible spaces,” she said.

“It could also just be someone who’s really sick, or they’re recovering from a surgery. Even if it’s temporary, it might not be visible but it still is genuine.”

Hobson said that while we think we’re not an ableist society, many instances show we are. Such a mentality may cause people with genuine disabilities hesitate to claim the services they require, simply so they’re not seen as playing the system.

“The more stigma there is, the less people are likely to claim very necessary services,” she said, noting such behaviour can injure a person’s self-esteem and cause them to feel further devalued.

As identified by SPARC BC, the organization to manage B.C.’s Parking Permit Program, someone who needs to park close to a building entrance because their health prevents them from walking far would qualify them for a parking pass permit. On their website it states that a parking pass permit for people with disabilities ensures that a person with mobility limitations can park in one of the designated parking stalls throughout British Columbia.

As per their application form, all applications require a referral from the applicant’s doctor.

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DisabilityParksville

30Apr

‘Different is beautiful’: 2-year-old born without hands to get puppy without a paw to change perceptions

by admin

VANCOUVER —
A Chilliwack, B.C., mother is hoping a dog can help show her two-year-old daughter Ivy who was born without hands that being different makes her special.

What started out as a quest to find the perfect dog turned into a mission to change how others view disabilities.

When Vanessa McLeod was just 19 weeks pregnant she was told by doctors she should terminate.

“One doctor said you have to think about her quality of life she is going to have no hands. It still makes me a little bit sick thinking that she could have not been here if we had listened to those doctors,” said McLeod.

Now, little Ivy is two years old and she is thriving.

“Her favourite thing to do is colour and she just uses her toes to hold the markers so she has just learned to do things differently,” said McLeod.

McLeod says Ivy doesn’t really notice she is different yet but knows as she gets older she will start to question things.

“Why she doesn’t have hands and why she was born that way and why her and not other people,” said McLeod.

She wanted to find a way to make those conversations easier and thought a puppy that was also born with a limb difference could help Ivy embrace her differences.

“You know you were born that way but different is beautiful and this puppy was also born that way and that is also a beautiful thing and I just think it would be a magical bond,” said McLeod.

They expected a long search for the right dog but it was meant to be. A puppy they named Lucky was born a few weeks ago right in their home community.

“Missing her front paw so it just feels like fate,” said McLeod.

Now that their family has found the perfect pup. Her hope is that speaking out changes the way others view disabilities in the first place.

“She’s a happy rambunctious little toddler and I love everything that is different about her so I encourage people not to view disabilities as sad or something to be pitied but something to be celebrated,” said McLeod.

McLeod has since written a letter to the doctors that told her to abort telling them what she wished they would have told her instead.

“I wish you (they) would have told me that we would find support within the limb difference community, within the disability community,” said McLeod.

McLeod says the genetics counselor responded to her letter and invited her to talk to genetics medical students to help teach them how to deliver diagnoses in a way that is not so negative.

“I’m excited for that opportunity to kind of challenge the way doctors think and maybe teach the next generation of doctors that differences are beautiful and it’s ok and these parents will find support and make it through and they will love their babies,” said McLeod.  

29Apr

New ICBC no-fault insurance model launches in May

by admin

VICTORIA —
As of May 1, ICBC’S enhanced care auto insurance program, also known as “no-fault insurance,” will be rolled out to drivers across the province.

“I think it’s a better system because there are more benefits for people to get better,” said Nicholas Jimenez, president and CEO of ICBC.

“Fault still matters, you will still pay higher premiums if you cause a crash,” he said.

The new insurance structure will save drivers an average of $400 per year, and provide expanded access to recovery healthcare for those who need it, according to ICBC.

“A big part of the savings in the new system is the fact that we won’t be spending hundreds of millions of dollars on litigation,” said Jimenez.

Under no-fault insurance, the injured party loses their right to sue for damages. including loss of wages, which could often be in the millions.

“But instead you could receive payments, like you might receive workers compensation board payments, regardless of who was responsible for the car accident,” said Michael Mulligan, a criminal defence lawyer.

That means the party at fault can get the same coverage and benefits as the person who is not at fault.

“The whole point of insurance is the many providing for the few,” said Colin Brown, president and CEO of Stratford Underwriting. “The few being those that need the money and they’ve taken that aspect of it away.”

In 1974, Brown helped the province setup ICBC. He’s not a fan of no-fault insurance but says we’re now stuck with it.

“It is a lot easier since they’re a monopoly,” said Brown. “They have control over the so-called ‘basic’ and if they say this is all now in basic, then so it is.”

ICBC says it’s confident in the new policy.

“It’s not just a good thing, it’s a great thing,” said Jimenez. “I think people are going to know when they go to renew their insurance and they see that it’s going to cost less.”

In the meantime, Mulligan has a suggestion for you on how to spend your ICBC rebate cheque.

“Consider purchasing your own private disability insurance,” said Mulligan. “I can tell you that’s what I have.”

“I don’t want to be beholden to ICBC in the terrible event that I wind up injured and unable to work,” he said. 

29Apr

Calgary Zoo — ZooNights

by admin

ZooNights is a regular day at zoo – with extended hours – so you can enjoy your favourite animals and the outdoor zoo grounds a little longer.

While there is no extra charge for ZooNights (daily admission rates apply), you may find some special entertainment around the park during the evening and there will be adult beverages and special concessions items available for purchase.

You can think of it as the 3 B’s – booze, bento boxes and buskers!

A friendly reminder that the Calgary Zoo is currently an ‘outdoor-only’ experience.

Our indoor animal habitats & buildings are currently closed, with the exception of Kitamba Café, retail shops and washrooms, in accordance with provincial health and safety measures.

22Apr

Langley condo fire: Investigation continues days after blaze forced dozens out of their homes

by admin

LANGLEY, B.C. —
An investigation continues into what caused a massive fire at a condo development in Langley Monday.

The explosive fire all but leveled the four-building pre-sale condo development that had been nearing completion.

There is no indication that the fire is suspicious, but Langley Township’s deputy fire chief, Bruce Ferguson, says an in-depth investigation is underway. That investigation includes other agencies and private fire investigators.

Ferguson says it appears the blaze began somewhere in the centre of the complex which was under construction.

The fire forced more than 100 people living nearby from their homes, but residents in all but two units have been allowed to return.

The flames broke out Monday about 9:30 p.m near 80th Avenue and 208th Street. The fire sent embers flying, where they started another fire a block away, heat from the flames melted the siding on a neighbouring home.

When crews arrived two of the towers were already on fire, but it quickly spread through the wood frame buildings.

Metro-Can Construction, which is the contractor for the site, said all four buildings at the Alexander Square Development, which were unoccupied and at various stages of construction, were affected.

By Tuesday, all that was left standing were two elevator shafts and the remnants of one of the buildings on the south side of the development.

A deputy fire chief described the blaze as “one of those fires you rarely see in your career.”

“So it’s a very big event,” Andy Hewitson said.

Michelle Molnar, who lives across the street from the development, said the siding and windows on her townhouse melted due to the intense heat.

“We’re so lucky this is all the damage we have,” she said. “If the wind had started blowing the other way it would have been a different story.”

The fire department is asking anyone with video of the fire or dash cam or security camera footage from the area between about 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m Monday to contact them to assist in the investigation.

A development website lists the project as being sold-out. It’s unclear what may happen next for buyers and the fire department says there is no chance of saving any part of the development.

“It’s a pile of rubble and hole in the ground right now,” Ferguson said.

With files from CTV News Vancouver’s Sheila Scott and Regan Hasegawa

24Mar

Beefs & Bouquets, March 24 – Nanaimo News Bulletin

by admin

BOUQUET Big shout out to the RCMP who recovered my stolen wallet. So much gratitude for all your hard work.

BEEF To the tailgater. You quoted from the drivers’ handbook, with little thought to reality. The tailgater would be ticketed and ICBC would mostly blame them.

BOUQUET To the RDN Transit supervisor who delivered my cell phone to me. I was devastated because all my information is in that phone. I couldn’t phone until my husband came home and I felt very vulnerable. Fortunately we were still able to reach someone to report the loss. The supervisor told me she was finishing for the day and wanted to get the phone to me because I would worry all weekend. What a relief! A huge thank you.

BEEF To our nice neighbours. Your heat pump goes off and on with a bang all night, right next to our bedroom. We are exhausted and have to nap during the day. Heat pumps are to be serviced every two years. We do ours, please do the same.

BOUQUET To the other apartment dweller who pointed out my filthy habit of spitting while smoking; you’re right, no more. Please accept my apology.

BEEF When vaccine producers test and gain approval for their products, we should follow their recommendations. For B.C. to ignore injection schedule recommendations is wrong, and just plays into the paranoia of anti-vaxxers.

BOUQUET To my friend Betty. While isolating because of COVID she knitted tuques for all my wonderful ElderDog volunteers. That is 11 tuques keeping 11 people warm while walking my dog.

BEEF To the City of Nanaimo. Without individual taxpayers there is no business. Why haven’t homeowners’ taxes been frozen or reduced?

BOUQUET To Kiwanis leadership team for its hard work, for the accessibility of the COVID vaccine shot and the Chinese food we all received in the manor. Thank you.

BEEF For people with disabled permits: do not park in a disabled parking stall if the disabled person is not leaving the vehicle. I cannot unload my husband into his wheelchair because the stalls at certain places are used by vehicles whose occupants sit in them. Yes, you’re disabled. So is my husband. He can’t get out if we can’t park in a disabled stall.

BOUQUET I’ve come across so much kindness: the lovely woman who works in the deli at Fairway Market, the pharmacy tech at London Drugs Nanaimo North who spent extra time mixing a compound for me, and a knowledgeable sales person at Lululemon. Finally the workers in the drive-thru at Tim Hortons also in Nanaimo North who are always so competent, friendly and cheerful when I see them every day. What a great week it was thanks to these people.

BEEF OK, noisy trucks in drive-thrus. The vehicle in front and behind you can’t order because your vehicle is too loud. It’s not necessary for your truck to be that loud. Seriously, next time I’m going just start honking my horn when you try to order.

BOUQUET To our MP Paul Manly for his involvement in the Canada-U.K. trade deal discussions. His advocating for the unfreezing of British pensions being paid to Canadians is much appreciated. This unfair and unjust treatment of these expats has gone on far too long.

BEEF To the neighbour in Nanoose Bay who insists on playing his music so loud outside we can hear it in our home with all the windows closed. This is not only against the bylaws, but disrespectful to everyone around you. Put on some headphones. There are first responder shift workers sleeping, not to mention we shouldn’t be subjected to listening to this.

BOUQUET To the shoppers and delivery drivers at Country Club Save-On-Foods. Above-and-beyond excellent service every single time. I am so very grateful for you.

BEEF To the person putting out rat poison in the hospital area; you killed the last brown squirrel in this neighbourhood.

BOUQUET To Patti, Nori, Sandy at North Town London Drugs. Always willing to help with a smile; it is a pleasure to shop there.

BEEF To the lady who was so impatient in the grocery lineup that she could not wait until the cashier had finished processing my grocery order before putting her items up on the belt. The cashier asked her to please wait until I was finished. I asked her to step back; she began yapping that she was six feet away.

BOUQUET To builders who keep their job sites tidy. Cleaning and recycling building waste takes a little effort but makes a huge positive impression. It also makes the landscapers’ job much more pleasant. Beef to builders who leave food waste inside walls, used coffee cups blowing around outside, and building waste strewn about their sites. Poor management and unnecessary.

BEEF To the person thanking 911 for their response and professionalism. It must be nice to actually get a response when you need help. I work within one block of the police station and have situations far too often that require emergency assistance and they never come or respond.

BOUQUET To all the kind people at Kitties and Cream cat café. You bravely started up this wonderful idea in the middle of the pandemic. Thanks for supporting pet adoptions and local artisans. Your feline products are the best and your service is great.

BEEF To the people walking their dogs on Strathmore Street who don’t clean up after them.

BOUQUET To our next-door neighbours. They came over and shovelled our walkway, our stairs and our driveway for both days of the snowstorm. Fantastic people.

BEEF To those who are so weak they have to abuse innocent, trusting children and animals. Karma train is coming for you.

BOUQUET To our parents, Valerie and Al-star, Thank you for caring enough to help James and I to enjoy our home. We love you both very much.

BEEF To all the entitled parents who drop off secondary school students in the middle of McGirr Road. This is not a drop-off zone; it is a road. There is a three-lane drop-off zone in the parking lot. It is not only dangerous, but selfish to think that all of the people on the road behind you have more time than you do, to wait for you.

BOUQUET To Connor from Real Canadian Superstore. Thank you for helping me with my groceries. It was very kind of you to help find what I was looking for.

BOUQUET A heartfelt thank you to the paramedics, doctors and nurses from Nanaimo and Victoria who took such great care of me after I had a heart attack. Wonderful people who don’t get the recognition they deserve. I am forever grateful.

BEEF To the beefer about wood stoves, it’s a lot cheaper than an electric furnace that runs up bills into the hundreds. Until they ban wood stoves we will keep burning the wood to heat our houses.

BOUQUET To Clint from Ernie’s Blackpoint Repair for volunteering his time to repair our pipe after someone’s failed attempt at stealing our catalytic converter. Your kind gesture to a complete stranger has restored our faith in humanity.

BEEF To the ‘N’ driver of the black BMW. Your speeding and reckless lane-changing almost caused a crash as we entered the highway at Oliver Road. To the parents, ground the N driver. No respect. Take the licence away.

BOUQUET To Rob at Ajac’s Equipment, he went the extra mile to quickly fix my pole saw after I had bashed it against my orchard ladder. So knowledgeable and committed to finding solutions.

BEEF Not sure how to comment regarding the new jail. Nothing but the best for our finest citizens. They could most likely sell building sites off to the tax payers and make enough to pay for a new jail from the proceeds. You should do a story about Canada’s jails compared to most any country south of the U.S. border. They don’t get a lot of repeat offenders.

BOUQUET Thank you to the paramedics, doctors and nurses from Nanaimo and Victoria who took such great care of me after having a heart attack. Wonderful people who don’t get the recognition they deserve. I am forever grateful.

BEEF To law enforcement for handing out COVID fines. Are all the unsolved crimes solved now?

BOUQUET To parks and rec staff for trying to keep recreation facilities open safely during this pandemic.

BEEF To the white BMW sedan driver driving on Lantzville Road. Were you as scared as my wife and I when you cut the corner at the top of the hill and just missed the two of us walking? Way too close and way too fast.

BOUQUET I was going down Haliburton Street on my scooter when I had to move off the road for cars and the sidewalk was not plowed. I hit a snowbank and upset. Wonderful people stopped and helped me up. Thank you so much. I will pass it on. We need more people like you.

BEEF To the grey Ram dually racer who cut the curve in front of Departure Bay school during school hours at twice the speed limit sending me into the safety bollards to avoid hitting him. Scraped the entire side of my car. How does this guy still have a driver’s licence?

BOUQUET A heartfelt thank you to Karen at ACE Courier. Dispatching must be very stressful and yet she always takes the time to respond to my long-winded enquiries with professionalism and cordial helpfulness. I think a raise is in order.

To submit a beef or a bouquet to the Nanaimo News Bulletin, e-mail editor@nanaimobulletin.com.

Beefs and bouquets

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23Mar

Saanich police remind residents to lock sheds after series of thefts from unlocked outbuildings – Victoria News

by admin



(Black Press Media file photo)

(Black Press Media file photo)

Saanich police remind residents to lock sheds after series of thefts from unlocked outbuildings

Four sheds entered, items stolen since March 15


Saanich police are investigating a series of thefts from sheds across the municipality since March 15. The common factor: all the sheds were unlocked.

Since mid-March, four residents have filed police reports after their sheds entered and, in most cases, items were stolen.

“A simple lock on the door and keeping shed windows closed can be useful deterrents against thieves looking for quick items to steal,” said Const. Markus Anastasiades, public information officer for the Saanich Police Department. “Other crime prevention methods include adding motion sensor lighting and a home security camera.”

Residents are advised to be on the lookout for suspects attempting to enter sheds on their property and to take this opportunity to secure outbuildings. Police also noted that those with unlocked sheds should check for missing items and contact the department’s non-emergency line at 250-475-4321 if items appear missing.


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

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Saanich Police Department

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