LOADING...

Category "BBG"

14Nov

Man accused of placing camera in winery bathroom facing voyeurism, child porn charges

by admin

VANCOUVER – The BC Prosecution Service has approved 18 criminal charges against a Kelowna man accused of placing a camera in the employee washroom at a winery.

Ian Michael Leighton, 43, is facing 13 charges of voyeurism, three charges of making child pornography, one charge of possessing child pornography, and one charge of obstruction of justice.

All of the charges stem from an investigation that began after a small camera was discovered in the washroom at Summerhill Pyramid Winery on Aug. 23, according to the prosecution service.

Kelowna RCMP announced on Aug. 26 that they had arrested a suspect in the case, noting that the suspect was “a male who was employed by the business.”

At the time, police did not confirm the name of the business at which the camera was discovered, but winery CEO Ezra Cipes told Castanet News that it was Summerhill.

“The staff member involved is no longer a staff member,” Cipes said at the time, noting that the winery had thoroughly searched its premises for other cameras and to ensure the public was not at risk.

“This happened to us, not by us,” Cipes said. “This has been very hard to deal with.”

Online court records indicate that Leighton is scheduled to appear in Kelowna provincial court on Dec. 9. He is not listed as being in police custody.

12Nov

Vancouver Island substitute teacher suspended for comments made during field trip

by admin

CAMPBELL RIVER – A Campbell River substitute teacher had his teaching certificate suspended after complaints were made of troubling behaviour during a Grade 8 field trip in November, 2018.

According to the B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation (BCCTR), substitute teacher Joshua Frederick Roland Laurin was overheard making concerning comments by students, many of which involved violence.

The consent resolution agreement for Laurin’s suspension lists the comments heard by students, which included Laurin saying that he did not like his job or being around kids, that he wished to use one student to beat two other students to death and injure a third, and that he wanted to use one of the students to “whack” two others.

After the field trip had concluded, and students were back in their classroom, Laurin also said that if he was going to die the next day he would want to hurt students as he would not face any consequences.

The consent resolution agreement says that some students described Laurin as “weird” and reported feeling shocked by his comments. However, the students also say they believe Laurin was joking.

On Nov. 8, 2018, two days after the field trip, the Campbell River School District (SD 72) issued Laurin a letter of discipline and suspended him from the teachers on call (TOC) list from Dec. 3 to Dec. 21, 2018. Following the suspension, he was also required to complete a course by the Justice Institute of BC called “reinforcing professional boundaries”, which he did in March 2019.

Once the BCCTR was contacted and became involved in April 2019, the organization decided to issue Laurin a one-day suspension as SD 72 had already suspended him for three weeks and required him to complete the professional boundaries course. The organization added that Laurin admitted to making the comments that the students heard and acknowledged that they were inappropriate and constituted as misconducted. 

“Laurin failed to appreciate how his comments might be interpreted by students,” reads the consent resolution agreement.

In a statement, SD 72 said that Laurin would no longer be employed by the Campbell River School District.

Meanwhile, another central island educator recently faced disciplinary action. On Oct. 29, the BCCTR released a document which detailed the events that led to the dismissal of a Comox vice-principal

The commissioner found that on June 19, 2018, a soiled pair of underwear was found on the lid of a toilet in the boys’ washroom at École Au-coeur-de-l’île and feces was found on the floor. 

In an effort to identify who the underwear belonged to, vice-principal Delphine Yvette Andrée Guérineau had male students line up in hallways and show her the waistband of their underwear. 

Guérineau was later fired for her controversial actions, though a former custodian at the school said that misplaced feces in the boy’s washroom was an ongoing issue.

“It wasn’t just some kid having an accident, it was definitely some little brat thinking that he could just go around and do what he wanted,” the former custodian, Chamela Smith, told CTV News earlier this month.  

8Nov

‘2 minutes to use the washroom’: Bus drivers say short breaks leading to stressful days

by admin

VANCOUVER – During the ongoing Metro Vancouver transit dispute, bus drivers say one of the big issues they’re upset about is their daily workload.

They’re especially frustrated about the amount of time they get between finishing one route and starting the next.

CTV News Vancouver went on a ride on one of the region’s busiest buses to get a first-hand look at working conditions.

On a Friday morning 99 B-line route to the University of British Columbia, driver Adam Flores was scheduled to have a 9-minute break between runs.

Due to traffic, his route was delayed, leaving Flores only two minutes to offload passengers, park his bus and use the washroom.

“We need that recovery time for our mental aspect and just to get out of the seat,” Flores said.

Another driver, Krista Lee Hanson said in these situations, drivers may have no time to get up.

“The worst part about it is you kind of have to think … ’do I stop here and run into a coffee shop?’,” Lee Hanson said. “If I do that I have to tell the passengers I’m running into a coffee shop … so I am inconveniencing them if I take care of my needs and there is always a risk of violence when you do that.”

Coast Mountain Bus Company president Michael McDaniel said the company hears drivers loud and clear; agreeing there needs to be more recovery time.

“I share that concern,” McDaniel said. “We have talked to our operators many times over the last number of months, it is something we’ve been working on prior to bargaining and in the bargaining process.”

CMBC said its latest offer to the union will promise more break time, but the two sides remain far apart and are not even talking.  

7Nov

Oppenheimer Park residents frustrated by closed, unclean washrooms

by admin

VANCOUVER – Pressure for action at Vancouver’s Oppenheimer Park is mounting, as advocates say the washrooms have been unusable.

A representative from the Carnegie Community Action Project said the portable toilets haven’t been cleaned in weeks, adding that they’re making people sick. 

Making matters worse, the group says, the permanent washroom inside the park has been temporarily closed because of plumbing issues.

“We’re sick and tired of these games that city hall is playing,” said tent city liaison Chrissy Brett in a news release. “These games are impacting the lives of 150 people and adding additional stresses and pressures on already vulnerable people.”

Brett added that some people occupied the permanent washrooms to prevent their closure.

Coun. Melissa De Genova told CTV News Vancouver that they’re aware of the state of the city-run washroom.

“There are issues with them right now, they’re not in good working order so they had to be closed down,” De Genova said. “We have heard that it’s been very difficult for our staff to work in the park.”

But De Genova said some city staff feel unsafe going in to clean and repair the washrooms. 

“We are putting people at risk every day, in my opinion, by sending them into a condition that we know is dangerous,” she said. 

Vancouver police have previously said the city has seen a spike in crime in 2019, which Deputy Chief Const. Howard Chow described as “stemming out of Oppenheimer Park and sprawling into the Downtown Eastside.”

In August, those living in the park were issued a notice requiring them to move out of the encampment. They were offered other accommodations through BC Housing, but some residents chose to remain in the park. 

The Vancouver Park Board has not sought an injunction against the remaining residents. 

With files from CTV News Vancouver’s Regan Hasegawa and Angela Jung 

6Nov

Thirty per cent of minority Canadians experienced discrimination at work: survey

by admin

Armina Ligaya, The Canadian Press


Published Wednesday, November 6, 2019 8:41AM EST

TORONTO — Thirty-per cent of Canadians who identify with a specific diversity group, including visible minorities and LGBTQ, have experienced at least one incident of discrimination at their current employer, a new survey suggests.

The poll, commissioned by the Boston Consulting Group’s Centre for Canada’s Future, found that 33 per cent of women said they had encountered at least one discriminatory incident, as did 33 per cent of LGBTQ and 34 per cent of those who identify as people of colour.

The percentage was higher for Indigenous respondents at 40 per cent, and for those with a disability at 41 per cent, according to the survey.

“That’s too high,” said BCG’s managing director and senior partner Nan DasGupta in an interview.

“It’s probably not what most Canadians would feel comfortable with in terms of how we think about the inclusivity of our culture, of our society, and our workplaces. So we think there is a lot of work to do still.”

BCG’s Centre for Canada’s Future, a non-profit arm of the consulting company focused on examining issues of importance to Canada, surveyed 5,082 working Canadians at companies with more than 1,000 employees in a variety of industries and roles.

The poll was conducted via an online panel from April 10 to May 1.

According to the polling industry’s generally accepted standards, online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not randomly sample the population.

While there is room for improvement, the survey’s results showed that Canadians fared better than similar countries when it came to obstacles to diversity and inclusion in recruitment, retention, advancement and leadership commitment at their companies, said DasGupta.

For example, among LGBTQ respondents, 24 per cent said there were obstacles in employee retention, compared with 32 per cent in Australia, 33 per cent in Denmark, Norway and Finland, 35 per cent in the U.K. and 36 per cent in the U.S.

Also, about 30 per cent of female respondents said there obstacles in recruitment, compared with 38 per cent in Australia, 39 per cent in the United Kingdom, 33 per cent in the U.S. and 31 per cent in Denmark, Norway and Finland, the BCG survey showed.

“Actually, the Canadian results fare pretty well… fewer people see obstacles on most dimensions,” DasGupta said.

However, Canada lagged behind the three Nordic countries sampled when it came to respondents views on obstacles in retention, advancement and leadership for women. DasGupta noted that Nordic nations have more progressive policies in terms of family benefits and gender equality.

“We still fare quite well compared to the other developed countries, but the Nordics have made much greater strides,” she said.

As well, the poll’s findings showed that those at the top were more optimistic about the company’s progress on diversity and inclusion than the actual employee base. For example, 52 per cent of Canadian executives surveyed said the firm had made progress in improving diversity in its top management team over the past one to three years, but just 40 per cent of non-executives agreed.

“Executive groups are actually skewed towards people who don’t have diversity as part of their makeup, and so they are a little bit less aware of some of the obstacles and don’t perceive the biases as much,” said DasGupta.

However, she noted, those at the upper levels of the firm are also more aware of diversity and inclusion initiatives that are underway.

DasGupta says that one way to push for progress is for executives to communicate the importance of these initiatives not just to the C-suite, but to middle managers as well.

“Make sure that if you are prioritizing this as a company, and you should, that that is getting disseminated and cascaded down to all of your leaders… Because we already know that that’s really what shapes the experience of most employees.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 6, 2019.

07:20ET 06-11-19

1Nov

‘Some little brat’: Former janitor says Comox school where VP fired was ‘overrun with feces’

by admin

COMOX – A former custodian who worked at a Comox francophone school is giving new insight into a controversy that resulted in the school’s vice principal being fired for professional misconduct.

Chamela Smith was a day janitor at École Au-coeur-de-l’île in Comox in 2018 when the vice principal undertook a controversial action to try to determine who left soiled underwear and feces inside a boy’s washroom.

Smith says it was far from an isolated incident.

“It wasn’t just some kid having an accident, it was definitely some little brat thinking that he could just go around and do what he wanted,” Smith said.

Delphine Yvette Andrée Guérineau was originally placed on paid leave and was then terminated from her position after disapproval was shown for one technique used in her investigation. Guérineau had male students show them the waistband of their underwear.

Smith says while she agrees Guérineau could have handled the situation better, she doesn’t think the matter warranted termination.

“She was really, in effect, trying to protect the other students in the school from disease, germs and the simple fact that their school was overrun with feces,” Smith said. “I had to clean – I don’t know how many times in a day – feces, urine out of garbage cans, off floors, off walls, it was put on the inside of toilet paper rolls … it was everywhere.”

Smith says the ongoing issue was the reason she no longer wanted to work at the school.

The B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation found that Guérnineau failed to consider the consequences of her actions, which “had the potential to cause emotional harm to students.”

An online petition was started in support of Guérineau, but she has since moved to Winnipeg.

Neither Guérineau nor the school district overseeing the Comox school have responded to CTV News Vancouver Island’s requests for interviews.  

31Oct

Metro Vancouver bus strike: Action to start with uniform, overtime ban

by admin

VANCOUVER – The union representing Metro Vancouver’s bus and SeaBus drivers has announced what possible strike action will look like on Friday if a tentative agreement is not reached by their deadline.

According to Unifor, if an agreement isn’t settled by 8 a.m. on Nov. 1, transit operators won’t wear uniforms on the job and maintenance workers will refuse overtime shifts. 

“Our number one goal is a fair contract that ensures our members are working under safe and reasonable conditions so they can best serve the public,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor national president, in a news release.

“To minimize the disruption to the public while still ramping up pressure on the employer, we have chosen a measured level of strike action in the first phase.”

Unifor says they think this first phase will increase exposure to negotiations.

“It is a strange experience to see an operator out of uniform, and we hope that starts conversations with the passengers about our struggle with this employer to get a fair deal,” said Gavin McGarrigle, Unifor western regional director and lead negotiator during the talks.

But if a deal isn’t reached, a ban on overtime could start to impact transit users, Unifor has warned. 

“The system has normalized overtime, so without it, the turnaround for repairs and other maintenance will build up quickly,” said Mike Smith, president of Unifor Local 2200 representing maintenance and SeaBus workers. 

“We trust that TransLink will not put unsafe vehicles back on the road, so it is a question of fewer vehicles available in the system.”

Contract talks are expected to continue Thursday. 

Earlier this month, Unifor Local 111 voted 99 per cent in favour of striking after months of contract negotiations broke down on Oct. 3.

When the 72-hour strike notice was announced, McGarrigle told CTV News Vancouver there continues to be issues over wages, benefits and working conditions for bus drivers.

“They need to have time to go to the washroom, have a bite to eat, just simply reset themselves and they aren’t having the time to do that,” McGarrigle said. “We need to make sure wages are fair and competitive and make sure generally they are respected by the company.”

Unifor also said overcrowding on buses is also leading to safety concerns.

“It has an impact on their mental health,” McGarrigle said. “When the passengers are feeling they are being passed up, when the drivers are being overworked eventually something’s gotta give.”

Earlier in the week Coast Mountain Bus Company said in a statement it remains committed to “reaching an acceptable negotiated settlement and is ready to return to the bargaining table as soon as possible.”

Before Unifor announced its plans, TransLink said it would use social media and its website to let transit users know if the system was going to be disrupted.

“It’s important to note that only bus SeaBus service is going to be affected by any job action Unifor undertakes,” said Jill Drews, a spokesperson for TransLink on Wednesday. 

The last time bus drivers walked off in Metro Vancouver was in 2001. That strike lasted four months. 

With files from CTV News Vancouver’s Sheila Scott  

31Oct

Metro Vancouver bus strike: Job action to start with uniform, overtime ban

by admin

VANCOUVER – The union representing Metro Vancouver’s bus and SeaBus drivers has announced what possible strike action will look like on Friday if a tentative agreement is not reached by their deadline.

According to Unifor, if an agreement isn’t settled by 8 a.m. on Nov. 1, transit operators won’t wear uniforms on the job and maintenance workers will refuse overtime shifts. 

“Our number one goal is a fair contract that ensures our members are working under safe and reasonable conditions so they can best serve the public,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor national president, in a news release.

“To minimize the disruption to the public while still ramping up pressure on the employer, we have chosen a measured level of strike action in the first phase.”

Unifor says they think this first phase will increase exposure to negotiations.

“It is a strange experience to see an operator out of uniform, and we hope that starts conversations with the passengers about our struggle with this employer to get a fair deal,” said Gavin McGarrigle, Unifor western regional director and lead negotiator during the talks.

But if a deal isn’t reached, a ban on overtime could start to impact transit users, Unifor has warned. 

“The system has normalized overtime, so without it, the turnaround for repairs and other maintenance will build up quickly,” said Mike Smith, president of Unifor Local 2200 representing maintenance and SeaBus workers. 

“We trust that TransLink will not put unsafe vehicles back on the road, so it is a question of fewer vehicles available in the system.”

Contract talks are expected to continue Thursday. 

Earlier this month, Unifor Local 111 voted 99 per cent in favour of striking after months of contract negotiations broke down on Oct. 3.

When the 72-hour strike notice was announced, McGarrigle told CTV News Vancouver there continues to be issues over wages, benefits and working conditions for bus drivers.

“They need to have time to go to the washroom, have a bite to eat, just simply reset themselves and they aren’t having the time to do that,” McGarrigle said. “We need to make sure wages are fair and competitive and make sure generally they are respected by the company.”

Unifor also said overcrowding on buses is also leading to safety concerns.

“It has an impact on their mental health,” McGarrigle said. “When the passengers are feeling they are being passed up, when the drivers are being overworked eventually something’s gotta give.”

Earlier in the week Coast Mountain Bus Company said in a statement it remains committed to “reaching an acceptable negotiated settlement and is ready to return to the bargaining table as soon as possible.”

Before Unifor announced its plans, TransLink said it would use social media and its website to let transit users know if the system was going to be disrupted.

“It’s important to note that only bus SeaBus service is going to be affected by any job action Unifor undertakes,” said Jill Drews, a spokesperson for TransLink on Wednesday. 

The last time bus drivers walked off in Metro Vancouver was in 2001. That strike lasted four months. 

With files from CTV News Vancouver’s Sheila Scott  

31Oct

Metro Vancouver bus strike: Union says talks have broken off the day before planned job action

by admin

VANCOUVER – Less than 24 hours before planned job action was set to take place if no deal was struck, the union representing Metro Vancouver’s bus and SeaBus drivers says talks have broken off.

Friday morning, Unifor said that if an agreement wasn’t settled by 8 a.m. on Nov. 1, transit operators wouldn’t wear uniforms on the job and maintenance workers will refuse overtime shifts. 

Shortly before 12:30 p.m., the union said talks had broken down.  

“Our number one goal is a fair contract that ensures our members are working under safe and reasonable conditions so they can best serve the public,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor national president, in a news release.

“To minimize the disruption to the public while still ramping up pressure on the employer, we have chosen a measured level of strike action in the first phase.”

Unifor says they think this first phase will increase exposure to negotiations.

“It is a strange experience to see an operator out of uniform, and we hope that starts conversations with the passengers about our struggle with this employer to get a fair deal,” said Gavin McGarrigle, Unifor western regional director and lead negotiator during the talks.

But if a deal isn’t reached, a ban on overtime could start to impact transit users, Unifor has warned. 

“The system has normalized overtime, so without it, the turnaround for repairs and other maintenance will build up quickly,” said Mike Smith, president of Unifor Local 2200 representing maintenance and SeaBus workers. 

“We trust that TransLink will not put unsafe vehicles back on the road, so it is a question of fewer vehicles available in the system.”

Contract talks continued Thursday and Coast Mountain Bus Company said it’s urging the union to hold off on job action until a deal is struck.

“If the union proceeds with job action, it will only punish transit users in Metro Vancouver, many of whom rely on our system for their daily commute,” CMBC president Michael McDaniel said in a statement.

“Without maintenance over time, we will see bus and SeaBus service cancellations, affecting customers.” 

Earlier this month, Unifor Local 111 voted 99 per cent in favour of striking after months of contract negotiations broke down on Oct. 3.

When the 72-hour strike notice was announced, McGarrigle told CTV News Vancouver there continues to be issues over wages, benefits and working conditions for bus drivers.

“They need to have time to go to the washroom, have a bite to eat, just simply reset themselves and they aren’t having the time to do that,” McGarrigle said. “We need to make sure wages are fair and competitive and make sure generally they are respected by the company.”

Unifor also said overcrowding on buses is also leading to safety concerns.

“It has an impact on their mental health,” McGarrigle said. “When the passengers are feeling they are being passed up, when the drivers are being overworked eventually something’s gotta give.”

Before Unifor announced its plans, TransLink said it would use social media and its website to let transit users know if the system was going to be disrupted.

“It’s important to note that only bus SeaBus service is going to be affected by any job action Unifor undertakes,” said Jill Drews, a spokesperson for TransLink on Wednesday. 

The last time bus drivers walked off in Metro Vancouver was in 2001. That strike lasted four months. 

With files from CTV News Vancouver’s Sheila Scott  

31Oct

Metro Vancouver bus strike: Talks break off the day before planned job action

by admin

VANCOUVER – Less than 24 hours before planned job action was set to take place if no deal was struck, the union representing Metro Vancouver’s bus and SeaBus drivers says talks have broken off.

Friday morning, Unifor said that if an agreement wasn’t settled by 8 a.m. on Nov. 1, transit operators wouldn’t wear uniforms on the job and maintenance workers will refuse overtime shifts. 

Shortly before 12:30 p.m., the union said talks had broken down.  

“Unfortunately it became very clear that we’re going to have to commit strike action tomorrow,” said Gavin McGarrigle, Unifor western regional director and lead negotiator, after the talks ended.

“Minutes before we sat down with the company they were already putting out a press release saying we were trying to punish transit users, which of course is the last thing that we want to do.”

McGarrigle claimed Coast Mountain Bus Company didn’t adequately address wages or competitive issues within the company.

“Most importantly, they made no changes at all to the working condition language that had already been rejected by the union. That working condition language that they tabled means that no transit operator has a guaranteed minimum level of break time on any given shift.”

If a deal isn’t struck soon, McGarrigle said transit users will start to feel the impact. 

“Transit users we will see maintenance and SeaBus overtime ban commence, that will have a very quick impact on the service,” he said. 

“The transit system is much, much bigger than it was in 2001. A lot of people rely on transit. So if there is impact, we think it will be substantially worse than in 2001. It may not happen right away, but it very quickly could be a significant inconvenience to the public.”

Ahead of contract talks on Thursday, CMBC urged the union to hold off on job action until a deal is struck. 

“If the union proceeds with job action, it will only punish transit users in Metro Vancouver, many of whom rely on our system for their daily commute,” CMBC president Michael McDaniel said in a statement.

“Without maintenance over time, we will see bus and SeaBus service cancellations, affecting customers.” 

Earlier this month, Unifor Local 111 voted 99 per cent in favour of striking after months of contract negotiations broke down on Oct. 3.

When the 72-hour strike notice was announced, McGarrigle told CTV News Vancouver there continues to be issues over wages, benefits and working conditions for bus drivers.

“They need to have time to go to the washroom, have a bite to eat, just simply reset themselves and they aren’t having the time to do that,” McGarrigle said. “We need to make sure wages are fair and competitive and make sure generally they are respected by the company.”

Unifor also said overcrowding on buses is also leading to safety concerns.

“It has an impact on their mental health,” McGarrigle said. “When the passengers are feeling they are being passed up, when the drivers are being overworked eventually something’s gotta give.”

Before Unifor announced its plans, TransLink said it would use social media and its website to let transit users know if the system was going to be disrupted.

“It’s important to note that only bus SeaBus service is going to be affected by any job action Unifor undertakes,” said Jill Drews, a spokesperson for TransLink on Wednesday. 

The last time bus drivers walked off in Metro Vancouver was in 2001. That strike lasted four months. 

With files from CTV News Vancouver’s Sheila Scott  

This website uses cookies and asks your personal data to enhance your browsing experience.