Category "Health"

17Oct

SAD plus COVID: A bit of light and a bit of exercise can make all the difference

by admin

The best way to prepare for the winter blues is to anticipate, prepare and plan to add light and exercise, say experts.

Article content

As the season of darkness and rain descends, the spectre of lowered mood, heightened anxiety and seasonal depression looms. The global pandemic has added an additional stressor to those vulnerable to mood disorders.

Advertisement

Article content

“Stress plays a role,” said Dr. Raymond Lam, an expert in seasonal affective disorder. “People who have clinical depression can have their depression start earlier, have symptoms worsen, and people with mild or winter symptoms can have major symptoms such as sadness, lowered mood, oversleeping, overeating.”

According to a recent Ipsos Reid poll , nearly three in 10 Canadians have reported a deterioration in mental health since the beginning of the pandemic, and according to Stats Canada , more Canadian adults screened positive for anxiety or major depressive disorder in 2021 than in 2020.

Lam, professor and B.C. leadership chair in depression research at UBC, said the best way to prepare for the season is to anticipate it, and understand our defences may be down due to the pressures of the pandemic.

Advertisement

Article content

“Not having the usual things that help with our resilience, such as exercise, gatherings, and friendships, means our coping behaviours are reduced,” said Lam.

Raymond W. Lam, professor and B.C. Leadership Chair in depression research, UBC, in his office.
Raymond W. Lam, professor and B.C. Leadership Chair in depression research, UBC, in his office. Photo by Handout /PNG

For those who have seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, a mood disorder that strikes during the autumn and winter seasons, light therapy , or exposure to 30 minutes of bright, artificial light a day, is a well-known, safe and effective treatment. However, Lam said research shows that even when skies are grey, exposure to natural light is beneficial.

Lam also suggests we get moving. “Exercise by itself helps depression, even clinical depression, and specifically for winter depression it is helpful.”

So what happens when restrictions, fear of COVID-19 infections or a dislike of being outdoors in bad weather keeps us from staying active?

Advertisement

Article content

New research by Dr. Eli Puterman has found that at-home exercise through fitness apps is an effective tool in managing depression.

At the beginning of pandemic restrictions in 2020, Puterman, an associate professor in the school of kinesiology at UBC, said that he heard countless stories from people he met who were suffering from isolation, loneliness and depression.

Puterman, a health psychologist, had maintained his workouts during lockdown using Down Dog, an app that provides a variety of exercise programs. He researched whether at-home exercise apps could provide some relief.

The results of his study, published last week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine , showed that at-home app-based workouts, especially those using a combination of high intensity interval training and yoga, provided significant reductions in depressive symptoms.

Advertisement

Article content

The study randomized a group of 334 women and men between 18-64 years old who were not involved in high levels of exercise, and assigned them to either yoga, HIIT, or both, and a control group was asked to maintain their current level of exercise.

Participants using the app all exhibited a steady decrease in their depression symptoms regardless of the type of exercise they did, and those with the most significant depression symptoms had the most dramatic improvements.

“The people in the study group categorized as having some kind of significant depression saw a drastic change,” said Puterman. “A good 70 per cent of them could no longer be categorized as having significant depression by the end of the study.”

Twenty minutes of vigorous exercise, four times a week, was enough to make a difference, said Puterman with those who used a combination of yoga and HIIT training receiving the greatest benefit.

Puterman said he hopes that public policy will shift to providing tools, tax incentives and education programs to help people incorporate more exercise into their routines.

At the individual level, Puterman reminds people to start slowly.

“Even a walk around the block can help,” he said.

Puterman also suggests using covered spaces in parks and school grounds to exercise outdoors, to get the added benefit of natural light exposure and fresh air.

dryan@postmedia.com

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

16Oct

COVID-19 update for Oct. 16-17: 667 new cases, 13 deaths | Deadly outbreak at Burnaby care home shows booster shots needed sooner | U.S. will accept mixed doses of vaccines from international travelers

by admin

Read more HERE .

— Gordon Hoekstra

Health professionals in private practice face vaccine order

B.C. doctors, dentists and other health professionals in private practice will soon be required to get vaccinated.

The provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, issued an order Friday putting unvaccinated health professionals on notice that they would be required to be vaccinated in order to see patients or provide care or services in B.C.

The notice was directed at health professionals not covered by previous orders, including those who work in private practice and do not have privileges at a hospital or health-care facility. Henry’s order did not set a deadline.

COVID-19 vaccinations are already mandatory for staff at long-term care homes and assisted living facilities. Anyone who works in a health-care facility, including hospitals, will be required to be fully immunized by Oct. 26.

Read more HERE .

 — Cheryl Chan

667 new cases of COVID-19, 13 deaths

B.C. reported 667 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, for a total of 196,433 cases in the province.

There are 5,128 active cases of COVID-19 in the province and 188,851 people who tested positive have recovered.

Of the active cases, 367 individuals are in hospital and 152 are in intensive care. The remaining people are recovering at home in self-isolation.

Getting answers on which B.C. schools still need ventilation updates proving frustrating

About 50 schools across B.C. are scheduled for upgrades to their ventilation systems during this academic year, so that the air in these crowded buildings is safer for kids and teachers during the pandemic.

These improvements, funded through the Education Ministry’s capital budget, are in addition to the 84 schools that had HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning) system updates in the 2020-21 academic year.

The province, however, has nearly 1,600 public schools. So once these projects are completed at these 125 or so schools over the two years since COVID arrived, how many of the remaining schools still need this type of work?

Finding an answer to this question was impossible because there is no centralized list. The ministry has left it up to each of B.C.’s 60 school boards to decide which buildings need ventilation upgrades and how those improvements should be achieved. The ministry has also left communication about these plans with the districts, and as a result many parents and teachers were left frustrated about a lack of clear answers.

Read more HERE.

-Lori Culbert

U.S. will accept mixed doses of vaccines from international travelers

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said late on Friday that it will accept mixed-dose coronavirus vaccines from international travelers, a boost to travelers from Canada and other places.

The CDC said last week that it would accept any vaccine authorized for use by U.S. regulators or the World Health Organization.

“While CDC has not recommended mixing types of vaccine in a primary series, we recognize that this is increasingly common in other countries so should be accepted for the interpretation of vaccine records,” a CDC spokeswoman said.

The White House said Friday the new vaccine requirements for foreign nationals traveling to the United States will begin Nov. 8 for visitors crossing at land borders as well as international air travelers.

-Reuters

Find out how your neighbourhood is doing in the battle against COVID-19 with the latest number of new cases, positivity rates, and vaccination rates:

15Oct

COVID-19: Health professionals in private practice face vaccine mandate

by admin

On Friday, B.C. recorded 667 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 new deaths.

Article content

B.C. doctors, dentists and other health professionals in private practice will soon be required to get vaccinated.

Advertisement

Article content

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry issued an order Friday putting unvaccinated health professionals on notice that they would be required to be vaccinated in order to see patients or provide care or services in B.C.

The notice was directed at health professionals not covered by previous orders, including those who work in private practice and do not have privileges at a hospital or health-care facility. Henry’s order did not specify a deadline.

COVID-19 vaccinations are already mandatory for staff at long-term care homes and assisted living facilities. Anyone who works in a health-care facility, including hospitals, will be required to be fully immunized by Oct. 26.

In a note sent to members on Friday, the College of Dental Surgeons of B.C. said it “interprets the order to mean that, in time, all of our registrants will be required to be vaccinated to provide health care or services in B.C.”

Advertisement

Article content

It said it supports Henry’s office and expects members to comply with provincial health officer orders.

Doctors of B.C. also said it supports mandatory vaccination of health-care workers. The vaccination rate among physicians is about 97 per cent, said the organization.

On Friday, B.C. recorded 667 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 new deaths.

Eleven of the deaths occurred in the Fraser Health region, where Willingdon Care Centre, a Burnaby long-term care facility, has been grappling with a COVID-19 outbreak since late September that has infected at least 90 people. Two deaths occurred in the Interior.

Out of 5,128 active cases in the province, 367 people are in hospital including 152 in intensive care.

The new figures come a day after Henry introduced “circuit-breaker” restrictions in most of northern B.C., where hospitals have been overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.

Advertisement

Article content

Northern Health, which has seen the highest rate of infections and hospitalizations in the province, reported 184 cases on Friday. Fraser Health had 246 cases; Interior Health, 101; Vancouver Coastal, 75; and Island Health, 59.

There have been 196,433 cases of COVID-19 and 2,055 deaths from the virus in B.C. since the start of the pandemic.

More than 3.8 million people, or 83 per cent of eligible British Columbians 12 and older, are fully vaccinated, while 89 per cent have received their first dose.

chchan@postmedia.com

twitter.com/cherylchan


G et the latest COVID-19 news delivered to your inbox weeknights at 7 p.m. by subscribing to our newsletter here.


CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email vantips@postmedia.com.

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

15Oct

COVID-19 update for Oct. 15: New ‘circuit-breaker’ restrictions introduced in northern B.C. | 10 deaths feared in outbreak at Burnaby care home | 580 new cases, nine deaths | B.C.’s vaccine cards hit with constitutional challenge

by admin

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said the new measures are meant to stop transmission and save lives. The new rules covers the entire health region, except for areas including Terrace and Kitimat that had high rates of vaccination, effective Oct. 15 until Nov. 19.

  • Personal gatherings, both indoor and outdoor, will be restricted to fully vaccinated people only.
  • Indoor personal gatherings are limited to five vaccinated people, while outdoor personal gatherings are limited to 25.
  • All indoor and outdoor organized events, such as weddings and parties, will require a COVID-19 safety plan and masks. Guests also have to be fully vaccinated. These indoor organized events are capped at 50, while outdoor events are capped at 100.
  • In-person worship services are closed, and will be limited to virtual services only

On Wednesday, the province reported 67 new cases of COVID-19 in the Northern Health Region and three deaths. There are 689 active cases in the region of about 300,000 people, which is only 32 fewer than currently active in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, a region that serves 1.25 million people.

10 deaths feared in outbreak at Burnaby care home

A COVID-19 outbreak at a Burnaby long-term care facility includes 90 cases and a death toll that’s expected to rise.

Out of the 90 infections at the Willingdon Care Centre in Burnaby, 69 are among residents in the 95-bed facility, while 21 cases involve staff, according to the most recent data from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control.

Three residents have died. On Thursday, B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix said due to a delay in reporting, he expects the number of deaths to rise to 10 in the coming days.

Dix said there has been a number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities, particularly in Interior Health, but the outbreak at Willingdon Care Centre is “by a significant margin, our most significant outbreak.”

Fraser Health declared an outbreak at the care home just over two weeks ago, on Sept. 28, when one resident tested positive. By Oct. 5, 39 residents and six staff have contracted the virus.

-Cheryl Chan

B.C.’s vaccine cards hit with constitutional challenge

In what may be a first for B.C., two women with physical disabilities have filed a constitutional challenge to the provincial government’s COVID-19 vaccine cards.

But a former B.C. attorney-general asked to comment on the case cautioned that Charter rights are not absolute and the government would likely argue that any infringement of the petitioners’ rights would be justified to prevent further harm caused by the pandemic.

The B.C. Supreme Court petition filed by Sarah Webb and Leigh Anne Eliason seeks a number of court orders including an injunction staying the legal effect or enforcement of the vaccine card orders.

Webb, a 39-year-old mother of two who lives and works in both Victoria and Calgary, says she got her first COVID-19 vaccine shot on May 2 but developed a reaction that included fatigue, cramping, heart arrhythmia and severe pain.

Read more HERE.

-Keith Fraser

B.C. ski resorts scramble to recruit winter workforce thinned out by COVID travel restrictions

Big White Ski Resort near Kelowna saw a surprising flurry of job applicants following the Thanksgiving long weekend to fill some of the 650 positions it’s trying to fill for the upcoming ski season, not that it takes any pressure off senior vice-president Michael Ballingall.

In a normal year, Big White would get five to six applicants for every position it offers, this year, deep in B.C.’s fourth wave of COVID-19, “we don’t have one-to-one,” Ballingall said, which is currently typical across a lot of ski resorts in the province.

Skiing proved to be a popular outdoor outlet for a lot of British Columbians during the first waves of the pandemic, which has resorts banking on another solid season.

Recruiting, however, remains a challenge as earlier COVID-related travel restrictions still make it difficult to secure the usual pool of snow-seeking foreign visitors that resorts traditionally relied on to fill out their workforce, and resorts compete with all other hospitality businesses to hire from an increasingly thin local labour pool.

Read more HERE.

-Derrick Penner

14Oct

COVID-19: B.C. introduces ‘circuit-breaker’ restrictions in Northern Health

by admin

The restrictions take effect Oct. 15 and will be in place until Nov. 19

Article content

Surging rates of COVID-19 infections in Northern B.C. have led to new “circuit-breaker” restrictions in most of the region, including limits on personal gatherings, suspension of in-person worship services and the closures of bars and nightclubs.

Advertisement

Article content

The new restrictions, announced Thursday by the provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, and Health Minister Adrian Dix, were meant in part to reduce the strain on the region’s health care system, which is being swamped with critically-ill COVID-19 patients, many of them in their 20s to 40s.

“We do not take these actions lightly,” said Henry. “We are intending for this circuit breaker to save lives, to lower the rates of transmission, to allow our hospitalizations to stabilize, and enable all of us to come back safely to celebrate the upcoming holiday season.”

The restrictions take effect Oct. 15 and will be in place until Nov. 19. P ersonal gatherings are restricted to only fully vaccinated people. Indoor gatherings will be capped at five people and outdoor gatherings at 25.

Advertisement

Article content

Attendees of organized events such as weddings and parties will be required to be fully vaccinated and wear masks. The events will be limited to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors.

The restriction on outdoor organized events, however, does not apply to Remembrance Day ceremonies.

Henry said she is working with Legions in B.C. and Yukon and the recommendation, similar to last year’s ceremonies, will be to keep Remembrance Day ceremonies small and invite only immunized people to attend in person.

The public health orders also suspend in-person worship services because “with the amount of transmission we are seeing in the North, it is no longer safe for us to have a mixing of people who are unvaccinated in these worship settings,” said Henry.

Advertisement

Article content

Churches and other places of worship will be limited to virtual services only, although there can be “single-person services” where people can go for “quiet reflection,” she said.

Bars and nightclubs will have to shut down. Restaurants which serve liquor will have to stop serving alcoholic beverages by 10 p.m.

The restrictions cover the entire Northern Health region, except the local health areas west of Kitwanga, including Terrace, Kitimat, Haida Gwaii, Prince Rupert, Stikine, and the Nisga’a areas — areas where the virus has not been able to spread because of high rates of vaccination, said Henry.

Cases in Northern Health started to climb in August. On a per capita basis, its seven-day moving average of new infections is nearly four times the provincial rate, according to data from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control, while its hospitalization rate is the highest out of all the health regions.

Advertisement

Article content

On Thursday, Dix said 58 critically ill patients — including 45 who were COVID-19 positive — had to flown out of the Northern Health region to hospitals in Metro Vancouver and Vancouver Island to free up more beds in the North.

“It’s a critical situation,” said Dix, who also noted that out of those 45 with COVID-19, only one was fully vaccinated.

Henry said the Delta variant is much more transmissible and spreads even with a small amount of exposure. It is also causing more severe illness in younger people, particularly those in their 20s to 40s, who are ending up in critical care.

On Thursday, B.C. reported 580 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the number of active cases to 5,348.

Out of the new infections, 22 per cent, or 129 cases, were in Northern Health. Fraser Health had 246; Vancouver Coastal Health, 53; Interior Health, 104; and Island Health, 48. In the last 24-hour reporting period, nine people have died of COVID-19. The provincial death toll now stands at 2,042.


G et the latest COVID-19 news delivered to your inbox weeknights at 7 p.m. by subscribing to our newsletter here.


CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email vantips@postmedia.com.

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

14Oct

COVID-19 update for Oct. 14: Point Roberts leaders want COVID test exemption for Canadian visitors |605 new cases, four deaths | Canadian snowbirds look forward to flocking to U.S. again next month | Alberta judge hands out fines instead of jail to prevent notoriety for violators

by admin

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C.

Article content

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C. for Oct. 14, 2021.

Advertisement

Article content

We’ll provide summaries of what’s going on in B.C. right here so you can get the latest news at a glance. This page will be updated regularly throughout the day, with developments added as they happen.

Check back here for more updates throughout the day. You can also get the latest COVID-19 news delivered to your inbox weeknights at 7 p.m. by subscribing to our newsletter here.


B.C.’S COVID-19 CASE NUMBERS

As of the latest figures given on Oct. 13:
• Total number of confirmed cases: 195,186 (5,172 active)
• New cases since Oct. 12: 605
• Total deaths: 2,033 (four additional deaths)
• Hospitalized cases: 357 (up 21)
• Intensive care: 153 (stable)
• Total vaccinations: 4,120,063 received first dose; 3,835,506 second doses
• Recovered from acute infection: 187,564
• Long-term care and assisted-living homes, and acute care facilities currently affected: 19

Advertisement

Article content

IN-DEPTH:   Here are all the B.C. cases of the novel coronavirus in 2021 | in 2020


B.C. GUIDES AND LINKS

COVID-19: Here’s everything you need to know about the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: B.C.’s vaccine passport is here and this is how it works

COVID-19: Here’s how to get your vaccination shot in B.C.

COVID-19: Look up your neighbourhood in our interactive map of case and vaccination rates in B.C.

COVID-19: Afraid of needles? Here’s how to overcome your fear and get vaccinated

COVID-19: Five things to know about the P1 variant spreading in B.C.

COVID-19: Here’s where to get tested in Metro Vancouver

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool


LATEST NEWS on COVID-19 in B.C.

Point Roberts leaders want COVID test exemption for Canadian visitors

COVID-19 testing requirements for Canadians driving home from the United States could only prolong the hardships for the tiny coastal town of Point Roberts, Wash., community leaders say.

Advertisement

Article content

Brian Calder, president of the Point Roberts Chamber of Commerce, said that before COVID-19, the community would see about 1.5 million visitors each year, but half of them often spent an hour or less in the town getting cheaper gas, buying groceries or checking on their cabins or boats.

When the U.S. border reopens to vaccinated Canadians, there will be no testing requirement to go south, but Canada requires a negative COVID-19 test to return and Calder said that’s a problem for Point Roberts.

Point Roberts only offers testing on Wednesdays and Sundays, which he said would limit Canadian visitors.

He said he’s hoping the Canadian government lifts the testing regulation for the town.

-The Canadian Press

Intensive care patient numbers stable in B.C. as 605 new cases reported

The number of people in intensive care in B.C. with COVID-19 is stable at 153, according to figures released on Wednesday.

Advertisement

Article content

There were 605 new cases reported over the past day and four deaths (bringing that toll to 2,033). There are now 5,172 active cases of the disease (a slight drop) of which 374 are being treated in hospital including the 153 in intensive care. These hospital numbers do not include patients who were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 and remain there but are no longer contagious.

Eighty two point seven per cent of B.C.’s population aged 12 and over is now fully vaccinated.

Canadian snowbirds look forward to flocking to U.S. again next month

While Canadian snowbirds are looking forward to being able to drive across the border to the United States next month, U.S. businesses in border areas are worried about the kind of restrictions Canada will place on travellers returning home.

Advertisement

Article content

The U.S. has announced it will remove restrictions on travellers who are fully vaccinated entering the country by land from Canada and Mexico some time in early November.

A pair of snowbirds who look forward to the change are Wendy Caban and her husband Geoff, both 73.

They’re already planning the four-day trip from their home in Lake Country in the Okanagan Valley to Mesa, Ariz.

Wendy Caban said they won’t head to the border crossing at Oroville-Osoyoos on the day the change takes effect. She said they’ll wait several days to see what the lineups are like.

“We are dancing jigs around our living room,” she said of the announcement.

“All snowbirds have been anxiously awaiting this news.”

-Kevin Griffin

Point Roberts leaders want COVID test exemption for Canadian visitors

Advertisement

Article content

Alberta judge hands out fines instead of jail to prevent notoriety for COVID-19 violators

An Alberta judge has decided to spare a pastor, his brother and a cafe owner jail time for violating COVID-19 rules because he didn’t want the three men to cash in on the notoriety of additional time behind bars.

Justice Adam Germain says that Pastor Artur Pawlowski and his brother, Dawid Pawlowski, will face stiff fines because they would like nothing better than to become martyrs with additional time in jail.

Alberta Health Services had recommended 21 days for the pastor and 10 days for his brother, but Germain opted for a $23,000 fine for Artur Pawlowski and $10,000 for Dawid Pawlowski plus probation, which will prevent them from leaving Alberta.

Advertisement

Article content

The Pawlowski brothers, who are from Calgary, were arrested in May and accused of organizing an illegal gathering as well as promoting and attending an illegal gathering.

Christopher Scott, owner of the Whistle Stop Cafe in the hamlet of Mirror, northeast of Red Deer, will pay $20,000 in fines and get 18 months probation as well.

He was also arrested in May at the end of an anti-lockdown rally.

-The Canadian Press


B.C. MAP OF WEEKLY COVID CASE COUNTS, VACCINATION RATES

Find out how your neighbourhood is doing in the battle against COVID-19 with the latest number of new cases, positivity rates, and vaccination rates:


B.C. VACCINE TRACKER



LOCAL RESOURCES for COVID-19 information

Here are a number of information and landing pages for COVID-19 from various health and government agencies.

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool

Vancouver Coastal Health – Information on Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

HealthLink B.C. – Coronavirus (COVID-19) information page

B.C. Centre for Disease Control – Novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Government of Canada – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Outbreak update

World Health Organization – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak

–with files from The Canadian Press

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

13Oct

COVID-19 update for Oct. 13: U.S. to lift Canada land border restrictions in Nov. for vaccinated visitors | Almost 2,000 workers in B.C.’s long-term and assisted-living homes refuse vaccination, risk dismissal | Outbreak at Tofino Hospital | 2,029 new cases, and 28 deaths on long weekend

by admin

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C.

Article content

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C. for Oct. 13, 2021.

Advertisement

Article content

We’ll provide summaries of what’s going on in B.C. right here so you can get the latest news at a glance. This page will be updated regularly throughout the day, with developments added as they happen.

Check back here for more updates throughout the day. You can also get the latest COVID-19 news delivered to your inbox weeknights at 7 p.m. by subscribing to our newsletter here.


B.C.’S COVID-19 CASE NUMBERS

As of the latest figures given on Oct. 12:

• Total number of confirmed cases: 194,581 (5,183 active)
• New cases since Oct. 8: 2,090 (603/634/468/385)
• Total deaths: 2,029 (28 additional deaths)
• Hospitalized cases: 357 (down three)
• Intensive care: 153 (up 16)
• Total vaccinations: 4,117,400 received first dose; 3,830,063 second doses
• Recovered from acute infection: 186,955
• Long-term care and assisted-living homes, and acute care facilities currently affected: 20

Advertisement

Article content

IN-DEPTH:   Here are all the B.C. cases of the novel coronavirus in 2021 | in 2020


B.C. GUIDES AND LINKS

COVID-19: Here’s everything you need to know about the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: B.C.’s vaccine passport is here and this is how it works

COVID-19: Here’s how to get your vaccination shot in B.C.

COVID-19: Look up your neighbourhood in our interactive map of case and vaccination rates in B.C.

COVID-19: Afraid of needles? Here’s how to overcome your fear and get vaccinated

COVID-19: Five things to know about the P1 variant spreading in B.C.

COVID-19: Here’s where to get tested in Metro Vancouver

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool


LATEST NEWS on COVID-19 in B.C.

Almost 2,000 workers in B.C.’s long-term and assisted-living homes refuse vaccination, risk dismissal

About four per cent of the 49,000 people who work at B.C.’s long-term and assisted-living homes hadn’t been vaccinated for COVID-19 by Tuesday, the first day a public health order requiring them to have at least one dose as a condition of their employment came into effect.

Advertisement

Article content

A similar order is coming later this month for health care workers in acute and community care settings.

For one of the largest LTCs, Menno Place in Abbotsford with 675 employees, that meant nine permanent workers and 19 casual employees were forbidden by a public health order from working and face termination in two weeks unless they get vaccinated, said CEO Karen Biggs.

“Some people chose to retire at this time rather than be vaccinated,” she told Postmedia via email. “Others are on long term disability or leaves so we don’t know their vaccination status.”

The province has collected data from all but four of the 546 long-term and assisted-living homes in the province. Of the 48,897 staff members approximately 96 per cent have had their first dose, and 93 per cent have had both doses.

Advertisement

Article content

-Susan Lazaruk

U.S. to lift Canada land border restrictions in Nov. for vaccinated visitors

The United States will lift restrictions at its land borders with Canada and Mexico for fully vaccinated foreign nationals in early November, ending historic curbs on non-essential travelers in place since March 2020 to address the COVID-19 pandemic, two U.S. officials said on Tuesday.

The rules, which will be formally announced by Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas on Wednesday, will cover land borders and ferry crossings. They are similar but not identical to planned requirements announced last month for international air travelers, the officials said in a call with reporters.

Lawmakers from U.S border states praised the move to lift the unprecedented restrictions which harmed the economies of local communities and prevented visits to friends and families.

Advertisement

Article content

“Since the beginning of the pandemic, members of our shared cross-border community have felt the pain and economic hardship of the land border closures. That pain is about to end,” Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said in a statement.

-Reuters

RCMP investigating after man glues doors shut at Langford vaccine clinic

RCMP on Vancouver Island are investigating after the door locks of a Langford COVID-19 vaccine clinic were glued shut.

The incident happened on Sept. 29 during off-hours at a clinic in Langford. The glue made the doors inoperable and entry into the clinic impossible.

The suspect is a man who is 5-foot-8, in his 50’s and has a medium build. He has a moustache and glasses, and was wearing a blue plaid shirt, blue jeans and a black poncho when the incident occurred.

Advertisement

Article content

“While we understand that not everyone share the same beliefs during this pandemic, this act of mischief is a criminal offence and will be treated as such,” said Const. Alex Bérubé of the West Shore RCMP in a news release.

Investigators were able to obtain video surveillance footage and are looking to identify the suspect.

-Mike Raptis

Outbreak declared at Tofino General Hospital

Island Health has declared a COVID-19 outbreak at Tofino General Hospital after evidence of transmission on the inpatient unit.

Four patients have tested positive for COVID-19 related to this outbreak. The outbreak at is limited to the inpatient unit. The emergency department and the rest of the hospital remains open. There has been no impact to other areas of the hospital at this time.

Advertisement

Article content

Upon declaring the outbreak, Island Health immediately implemented precautions, including enhanced cleaning and contact tracing to protect the health of all patients, staff and medical staff. Communication with patients, families and staff is ongoing.

Island Health has implemented comprehensive strategies to prevent and respond to COVID-19 in long-term care, acute care, assisted living and licensed facilities.

Active cases falling, but B.C. reports 28 deaths over past four days

B.C. reported 28 deaths over the long weekend and 2,090 new cases of COVID-19.

The only bright note in today’s numbers is that the case count got progressively lower over the fours days (dropping from 603 to 385) and the number of active cases fell 786 to 5,183.

Advertisement

Article content

There were 9,734 first doses of vaccine administered during the same period and 18,987 second doses – leaving 82.6 per cent of B.C.’s population aged 12 and over fully vaccinated.

Of the active cases, 357 are being treated in hospital including 153 in intensive care.

There have been two new health-care facility outbreaks at West Shore Laylum and Evergreen Manor (Fraser Health), for a total of 19 active outbreaks.

From Oct. 4-10 people not fully vaccinated accounted for 68.1 per cent of cases.


B.C. MAP OF WEEKLY COVID CASE COUNTS, VACCINATION RATES

Find out how your neighbourhood is doing in the battle against COVID-19 with the latest number of new cases, positivity rates, and vaccination rates:


B.C. VACCINE TRACKER



LOCAL RESOURCES for COVID-19 information

Here are a number of information and landing pages for COVID-19 from various health and government agencies.

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool

Vancouver Coastal Health – Information on Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

HealthLink B.C. – Coronavirus (COVID-19) information page

B.C. Centre for Disease Control – Novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Government of Canada – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Outbreak update

World Health Organization – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak

–with files from The Canadian Press

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

12Oct

COVID-19: Almost 2,000 workers in B.C.’s long-term and assisted-living homes refuse vaccination, risk dismissal

by admin

“Some people chose to retire at this time rather than be vaccinated. Others are on long term disability or leaves so we don’t know their vaccination status.” — Menno Place CEO Karen Biggs

Article content

About four per cent of the 49,000 people who work at B.C.’s long-term and assisted-living homes hadn’t been vaccinated for COVID-19 by Tuesday, the first day a public health order requiring them to have at least one dose as a condition of their employment came into effect.

Advertisement

Article content

A similar order is coming later this month for health care workers in acute and community care settings.

For one of the largest LTCs, Menno Place in Abbotsford with 675 employees, that meant nine permanent workers and 19 casual employees were forbidden by a public health order from working and face termination in two weeks unless they get vaccinated, said CEO Karen Biggs.

“Some people chose to retire at this time rather than be vaccinated,” she told Postmedia via email. “Others are on long term disability or leaves so we don’t know their vaccination status.”

The province has collected data from all but four of the 546 long-term and assisted-living homes in the province. Of the 48,897 staff members approximately 96 per cent have had their first dose, and 93 per cent have had both doses.

Advertisement

Article content

Any scheduled workers who hadn’t been vaccinated were placed on immediate leave, according to Biggs.

Karen Biggs, CEO at Menno Place in Abbotsford.
Karen Biggs, CEO at Menno Place in Abbotsford. Photo by Francis Georgian /PNG

“Unvaccinated staff go on unpaid leave until the (Oct.) 26,” said Biggs. “After that date, if they have not started a vaccination plan, they will be terminated so we can post their positions permanently, with benefits.”

Workers who choose not to be vaccinated will face “definite employment consequences,” said Mike Old of the Hospital Employees’ Union, which represents 20,000 of the workers in senior homes, most of them care aides.

He said the union has an obligation to support its members and would review any grievances on merit. And he said “anybody can go the B.C. human rights tribunal” with a complaint but he admitted the odds of winning a decision at the tribunal are slim.

Advertisement

Article content

Old said long-term and assisted-living homes are required by law to ensure all workers are vaccinated. Workers will have a chance to apply for a medical exemptions but conditions for those are strict, he added.

Under new provisions of the health order released this weekend, workers with one dose as of Tuesday could continue to work as long as they wear PPE, get regular rapid tests and plan a second dose in 28 to 35 days.

Those with zero doses can keep their jobs if they get their first dose before Oct. 25, after which they would remain off work for another seven days and then will need to follow the same prevention precautions when resuming work.

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

12Oct

COVID-19 update for Oct. 12: B.C. health officials to offer COVID-19 update at noon | Parents concerned about spread in schools, support mask mandates: survey

by admin

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C.

Article content

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C. for Oct. 12, 2021.

Advertisement

Article content

We’ll provide summaries of what’s going on in B.C. right here so you can get the latest news at a glance. This page will be updated regularly throughout the day, with developments added as they happen.

Check back here for more updates throughout the day. You can also get the latest COVID-19 news delivered to your inbox weeknights at 7 p.m. by subscribing to our newsletter here.


B.C.’S COVID-19 CASE NUMBERS

As of the latest figures given on Oct. 8:

• Total number of confirmed cases: 192,491 (5,969 active)
• New cases since Oct. 7: 743
• Total deaths: 2,001 (five additional deaths)
• Hospitalized cases: 360 (down 13)
• Intensive care: 137 (up five)
• Total vaccinations: 4,107,666 received first dose; 3,811,076 second doses
• Recovered from acute infection: 184,121
• Long-term care and assisted-living homes, and acute care facilities currently affected: 17

Advertisement

Article content

IN-DEPTH:Here are all the B.C. cases of the novel coronavirus in 2021 | in 2020


B.C. GUIDES AND LINKS

COVID-19: Here’s everything you need to know about the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: B.C.’s vaccine passport is here and this is how it works

COVID-19: Here’s how to get your vaccination shot in B.C.

COVID-19: Look up your neighbourhood in our interactive map of case and vaccination rates in B.C.

COVID-19: Afraid of needles? Here’s how to overcome your fear and get vaccinated

COVID-19: Five things to know about the P1 variant spreading in B.C.

COVID-19: Here’s where to get tested in Metro Vancouver

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool


LATEST NEWS on COVID-19 in B.C.

B.C. health officials to offer COVID-19 update at noon

British Columbia’s health minister and top public health doctor are set to provide an update today on the COVID-19 situation.

Advertisement

Article content

Adrian Dix and Dr. Bonnie Henry are due to speak at noon.

The province last reported daily case numbers on Friday, when there were 743 new COVID-19 diagnoses and five added deaths.

As of Friday, 88.6 per cent of eligible B.C. residents had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, while 82.2 per cent were fully vaccinated.

As it stands, only those 12 and up are eligible to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in Canada, but the province confirmed over the weekend that it had opened up registration for younger kids through the Get Vaccinated portal.

Pfizer has requested Health Canada approve its vaccine for kids aged five to 11, and the B-C government is getting its ducks in a row for if and when that approval comes.

B-C Health spokesman Jeffrey Ferrier has said kids will be scheduled for their vaccination based on when it’s their turn, not when they register.

Advertisement

Article content

He says the province will notify parents when it’s time to book an appointment for their children.

– The Canadian Press

Parents concerned about COVID-19 spread in schools, support mask mandates: survey

The majority of respondents in a newly released Canada-wide survey say they are concerned about the spread of COVID-19 in schools and want children and staff to wear masks.

The survey by the Canadian Hub for Applied and Social Research at the University of Saskatchewan was done by phone between Sept. 3 and Sept. 28. It asked 1,000 people about any worries in sending kids to school and their thoughts on what public health orders should be in place.

Most respondents (89 per cent) said they were vaccinated. Of those with children 12 and older who are eligible to get a dose, 81 per cent said their kids were also vaccinated.

Advertisement

Article content

“Those who are vaccinated are more likely to have kids who are vaccinated and want to see the kids in the schools and staff wearing masks,” said research director Jason Disano.

Parents have been watching closely as children returned to classrooms across the country during the fourth wave of the pandemic.

The survey said respondents were largely confident in the safeguards at their children’s schools.

– The Canadian Press

Fraser Health schools have 30 times more active exposures than those in Vancouver Coastal Health

There are 174 active COVID-19 exposures in schools within Fraser Health compared to just six within Vancouver Coastal Health, latest figures show.

This comes despite Vancouver Coastal Health’s population (1.25 million) being just 30 per cent less than within Fraser Health (1.8 million) — though Fraser Health has a higher proportion of younger people than Vancouver Coastal Health.

Advertisement

Article content

The latest Fraser Health active school exposure tally includes 32 exposures within Surrey Schools district and 27 within independent schools — the highest two numbers within districts in that health region.

None of Fraser Health’s 13 schools districts are without a COVID-19 exposure — and eight districts have more than 10 active exposures — while half of the 10 school districts within Vancouver Coastal Health have no active exposures.

The Vancouver School District (with 50,000 students) has three active exposures, compared to the 32 in Surrey (with 75,000 students).

There are 79 active exposures in schools within Interior Health — including six in Cranbrook, where the percentage of people aged 12 and over who are fully vaccinated is 74 per cent, compared to the provincial average of 82.2 per cent. The lowest vaccination rate within that health authority is in Enderby at 62 per cent.

Advertisement

Article content

– David Carrigg

B.C.’s long-term care home workers allowed to work in more than one facility if short staffed

B.C.’s long-term care homes and assisted living facilities will again be able to request staff work in more than one facility should they face staff shortages.

A last-minute public health order to that effect was issued as employees at such facilities are required to be fully vaccinated by Tuesday, Oct. 12.

The exemption for vaccinated workers to work in more than one facility is a reversal of a health order issued in March 2020 designed to help stop the deadly spread of COVID-19 in those facilities, and it is one of many “extraordinary interventions” health authorities are advising home operators to use to deal with any staff shortage as a result of the vaccination order.

Advertisement

Article content

“Operators should assume that all staff who have not had dose one by Friday, Oct. 8, will likely be ineligible to work” on Tuesday, said the directive from the public health office, dated Friday.

Health ministry staff didn’t return a request for comment on the holiday Monday.

“There is definitely going to be some gaps in staffing levels,” said Mike Klassen, spokesman for the B.C. Care Providers Association. “Some operators are going to find it more difficult than others.”

Klassen said it’s not known how many of the 40,000 workers in long term care and assisted living homes remain unvaccinated.

Health Minister Adrian Dix has said it is likely health care workers are inoculated at a higher rate than the provincial average. As of Friday, 73 per cent of British Columbians were fully vaccinated.

Advertisement

Article content

B.C. has warned operators to be prepared for staff shortages and has set out three tiers of escalating remedies.

– Susan Lazaruk

MONDAY

Dangerous blood clots can occur in moderate COVID-19

A European study has found an elevated risk of a life-threatening blood clot called venous thromboembolism (VTE) in COVID-19 patients who were not critically ill.

The blood clot risk had previously been associated with severe COVID-19.

The researchers tracked 2,292 patients who came to hospital emergency rooms with mild or moderate COVID-19 but without VTE. Four weeks later, VTE had developed in roughly one of every 200 mildly ill patients who had not been hospitalized and nearly five of every 200 moderately ill patients overall, the researchers reported on Friday in Thrombosis Research.

Advertisement

Article content

They conclude that doctors caring for mildly and moderately ill COVID-19 patients need to be aware of these risks, “especially in patients with moderate COVID-19 requiring hospitalization.”

– Reuters

 Mink to get COVID vaccine in Finland

Keen to avoid the total annihilation of farmed mink as seen in Denmark during the pandemic, the Finnish fur industry is organizing an inoculation program for the animals.

The Nordic nation has about half a million doses of a domestically developed vaccine ready to be deployed this winter, enough to protect the entire population of breeding minks from COVID-19. It’s the first such program in the European Union.

Mink are known to be particularly susceptible to the virus. Denmark last year culled 17 million animals after concerns emerged that a mutated form of the virus was spreading through its farms, and there’s evidence from the Netherlands the virus can jump between humans and mink.

Advertisement

Article content

In Finland, farms operate under strict lockdowns and close surveillance. No infections have so far been confirmed in the country’s minks throughout the pandemic.

Marja Tiura, managing director of the Finnish Fur Breeders’ Association, said the vaccinations are carried out “to ensure the welfare of animals as well as to safeguard human health” and avoid the emergence of virus reservoirs. Interest in the vaccine has been “massive,” she said in an interview on Monday, though the substance developed jointly with the University of Helsinki only has a conditional usage permit since late September.

In July,  British Columbia has placed a moratorium on new mink farms and capped existing farms at their current numbers following outbreaks at several farms in the Fraser Valley.

Advertisement

Article content

– Bloomberg

Merck Seeks Emergency Use Authorization for COVID-19 Pill

Merck & Co. and its partner Ridgeback Biotherapeutics LP sought emergency use authorization in the U.S. for molnupiravir, moving the pill closer to becoming the first oral antiviral treatment for Covid-19.

An application was submitted with the Food and Drug Administration for molnupiravir to treat mild-to-moderate Covid-19 in adults at risk of developing a severe illness that may require hospitalization, the companies said in a statement Monday.

Submissions to regulatory authorities worldwide are expected in the coming months after an interim analysis of clinical trial data found it cut the risk of hospitalization for such patients by half.

Advertisement

Article content

– The Canadian Press


B.C. MAP OF WEEKLY COVID CASE COUNTS, VACCINATION RATES

Find out how your neighbourhood is doing in the battle against COVID-19 with the latest number of new cases, positivity rates, and vaccination rates:


B.C. VACCINE TRACKER



LOCAL RESOURCES for COVID-19 information

Here are a number of information and landing pages for COVID-19 from various health and government agencies.

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool

Vancouver Coastal Health – Information on Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

HealthLink B.C. – Coronavirus (COVID-19) information page

B.C. Centre for Disease Control – Novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Government of Canada – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Outbreak update

World Health Organization – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak

–with files from The Canadian Press

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

8Oct

World Mental Health Day: COVID-19 has led to increase in psychological symptoms and people seeking help

by admin

The good news is, there is lots of help available and it’s easy to access virtually.

Article content

Mental-health problems brought on by viral outbreaks, such as COVID-19, have long been called parallel epidemics, and research during the current crisis seems to bear that out.

Advertisement

Article content

“When we talk about the impact of COVID on mental health, the impact is due to multiple factors,” said Dr. Lakshmi Yatham, the University of B.C.’s head of psychiatry as well as the regional head and program medical director of Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) and Providence Health.

One factor, of course, is having COVID itself.

“But also all the others things that came with COVID: Lockdowns, social isolation, social-rhythm destruction,” Yatham said. “But also a financial impact as well, because many people lost their jobs.”

Yatham, co-author of an editorial in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry on the mental health of communities during COVID, was speaking ahead of Sunday’s World Mental Health Day: It’s time to make quality mental-health care for all a reality, says the WHO.

Advertisement

Article content

On Oct. 8, there were 743 new cases of COVID in B.C. for a total of 192,491 cases in the province. There have been five new deaths, for a total of 2,001 since the start of the pandemic. Eighty-eight-point-six per cent of eligible people age 12-and-over have received their first dose of the vaccine and 82.2 per cent have received their second dose.

Because COVID is relatively new, doctors and scientists around the world have been eager to come up with new information to try to understand its impact at several levels from a mental-health perspective, said Yatham. He and his team have studied surveys about physical and mental effects, feelings of anxiety, depression, increased alcohol and drug use.

“Lots of surveys have indicated that COVID has had a huge impact on the mental health of populations, with numbers varying depending upon where the survey was done, when the survey was done, who the target population was, that sort of thing,” he said. “So for example, a survey done in the U.S. indicated that 40 per cent of the population were exhibiting symptoms of anxiety, depression, stress-related (issues). Before the pandemic that number would have been more like 10 per cent.

Advertisement

Article content

“So there’s a huge increase in terms of the number of people, the proportion of people, reporting symptoms of those things. But what those surveys don’t tell us is, are they feeling anxious and depressed or do they actually have a psychiatric disorder?”

All of us at times, for a variety of reasons, feel anxious, upset, sad, irritable or angry, Yatham said. That’s not to say it indicates a psychiatric disorder, he said.

“The question is, how many (people reporting symptoms) actually have the disorders, that’s the type of research that is starting to come out.”

Yatham and a colleague, Dr. Daniel Vigo, recently got a grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research to identify groups of patients who are at increased risk of developing adverse mental-health outcomes because of COVID, with an eye to making it easier to access effective treatments. One thing they looked at was comparing during the second wave of the virus in B.C. people hospitalized because of COVID with those in hospital because of flu, and the same two groups that didn’t require hospitalization.

Advertisement

Article content

The results were a bit surprising.

Roughly, as many hospitalized flu-sufferers over the previous eight years sought mental-health counselling within three months of leaving hospital as did those hospitalized with COVID (about 30 per cent in each case), but for those not hospitalized, twice as many with COVID sought mental-health help as did flu-bug victims (about 13 per cent versus six or seven per cent).

“This is still very preliminary data so we still need to do more analysis to fully understand it,” Yatham said. “But clearly, in the mild-to-moderate COVID people the incidence of psychiatric conditions seems to be much higher.”

Another study Yatham was part of found worsening of depression and bipolar disorder correlated with the degree of lockdown — the more severe it was, the more people’s mental health suffered.

Advertisement

Article content

“With COVID, all of us shut down our social lives, in a way. You’re sitting at home watching TV, no social contacts, your biological rhythms and social rhythms are completely disrupted, all of which are important for good mental health,” he said.

Research continues and more will be found out down the road, but if there’s good news it’s that help has never been easier to find.

Pre-pandemic, pretty much every counselling session would’ve been in-person, Yatham said, but phone and video-conference counselling has soared — up to 95 per cent of psychiatric care provided in the VCH region was done virtually at one point during COVID.

As well, VCH-supported mental health crisis lines are getting four times the volume of calls they did pre-pandemic.

“Now there are lots of opportunities,” Yatham said. “Don’t hesitate to seek help.”

gordmcintyre@postmedia.com

twitter.com/gordmcintyre

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

This website uses cookies and asks your personal data to enhance your browsing experience.