Category "Social Development and Poverty Reduction"

14Oct

Early childhood education training leads to jobs in Nanaimo

by admin

Sixteen British Columbians are qualified and working as certified early childhood educators, thanks to a Community and Employer Partnerships (CEP) project from the Government of British Columbia.

“There’s a great need for early childhood educators, locally and throughout the province,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “It’s good to know that graduates of this project are in high demand. Parents will be able to go to work knowing their children are in safe and qualified hands.”

Last year, the Province provided more than $300,000 to Sprott Shaw College in Nanaimo to deliver full-time education, certification courses and work experience through its early childhood education certificate program.

“This partnership is a great example of how committed we are to recruiting and investing in the child care professionals we need throughout B.C.,” said Katrina Chen, Minister of State for Child Care. “Our Childcare BC goal is to help children get the best start in life, and early childhood educators are vital in setting our kids up for success by helping develop their critical thinking, communication and social skills.”

Participants received theory and virtual classroom education in life-skills development and occupational skills, as well as 10 weeks of supervised work placement and one week of supported job search.

“For families in Nanaimo, having more qualified early childhood educators means more safe, affordable, quality child care options when and where they need them,” said Sheila Malcolmson, MLA for Nanaimo. “This new CEP project in Nanaimo helps meet British Columbia’s goal of universal $10-a-day child care, working with communities and child care providers.”

Funding for this project was provided through the Project Based Labour Market Training stream of WorkBC’s CEP. CEP’s investments are targeted towards projects that support an inclusive economic recovery. CEP supports B.C. job seekers’ training and work experience leading to employment and aids businesses and communities to address labour market challenges. CEP invests $15 million annually in communities throughout B.C.

“The implications of having quality early child care available are far reaching and long lasting, making a difference not only in the individual’s life, but a difference for whole communities,” said Victor Tesan, president, Sprott Shaw College. “A collaboration such as this has enabled Sprott Shaw College to be able to provide the education and training for future early childhood educators who will go on to make a positive difference in the lives of so many.”

Full-time, group-based classroom learning for the project occurred from September 2020 to September 2021. Anyone interested in finding out more about upcoming CEP projects can contact their local WorkBC centre.

Learn More:

Learn how CEPs are helping local communities: www.workbc.ca/Employment-Services/Community-and-Employer-Partnerships.aspx

Learn about how WorkBC can help find British Columbians jobs that are right for them: www.workbc.ca/rightforyou

Find your local WorkBC centre: https://www.workbc.ca/Employment-Services/WorkBC-Centres/WorkBC-Centres-Listing.aspx

Sprott Shaw College: sprottshaw.com/campus/nanaimo-college-campus-sprott-shaw-college/

12Oct

Jobs, skills training offered to male survivors of abuse

by admin

As many as 12 eligible British Columbians will get skills training and work experience to prepare them for jobs as general construction workers and labourers.

This is a new Community and Employer Partnerships (CEP) project from the Government of British Columbia and is intended for male survivors of violence and/or abuse.

“The overall outlook for jobs in construction labour is projected to grow faster than all other occupations in B.C.,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “That’s good news for graduates of this unique project. Participants will receive personal support, as well as the skills training they need to help find and keep well-paying jobs.”

The Province is providing almost $170,000 to Kinghaven Peardonville House Society in Abbotsford to deliver skills and certification courses in its general construction program, The Purpose Project.

Project participants will receive nine weeks of occupational and employability skills training, four weeks of on-the-job work experience and one week of followup support to assist in their job search.

Participants will also receive certification courses in Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS 2015-GHS) and WHMIS GHS Implementation, fall protection, skid steer and telehandler operation, counterbalance forklift safety, Occupational First Aid Level 1 and introduction to construction warehousing.

In addition, each participant will receive up to 10 weekly sessions of one-on-one trauma counselling support.

“The project will be working with male survivors of violence, a largely underserved demographic,” said Keith St. Jean, employment co-ordinator, Kinghaven Peardonville House Society. “We are excited about seeing these men gain the skills and confidence they need to succeed and look forward to supporting our clients in multiple areas – an approach we believe will lead to greater success.”

Funding for this project is provided through the Project Based Labour Market Training stream of WorkBC’s CEP. CEP’s investments are targeted toward projects that support an inclusive economic recovery. CEP supports B.C. job seekers’ training and work experience, leading to employment in available jobs, and aids businesses and communities to address labour market challenges. CEP invests $15 million annually in communities throughout B.C.

“Through this program, people will get the skills training and support they need to prepare them for well-paying, rewarding jobs,” said Pam Alexis, MLA for Abbotsford-Mission. “It’s exciting to see this unique CEP project coming to Abbotsford.”

Full-time, group-based classroom learning for this project starts on Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021. Project activities run through to Jan. 21, 2022. Anyone interested in finding out more about this or other CEP projects can contact their local WorkBC centre.

Learn More:

Learn how CEPs are helping local communities: www.workbc.ca/Employment-Services/Community-and-Employer-Partnerships.aspx

Learn about how WorkBC can help find British Columbians jobs that are right for them: www.workbc.ca/rightforyou

Find your local WorkBC centre: https://www.workbc.ca/Employment-Services/WorkBC-Centres/WorkBC-Centres-Listing.aspx

Kingshaven Peardonville House Society: https://kinghaven.ca/

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports North Coast First Nations

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Five First Nation communities on the North Coast will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nation communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous peoples experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations’ citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

North Coast projects:

  • Gitga’at Nation — $35,000 to train community members in traditional food-preparation methods and build a freezer and smokehouse to serve the community at large.
  • Gitxaala Nation — $34, 220 to offer a regalia-making program for the Nation’s 75 members and develop a skill-development program for the community.
  • Kispiox Band — $34,190 to expand the community garden, deliver Indigenous farm training and develop food security and skills-building programs.
  • Kitselas First Nation — $35,000 to explore and develop food security and cultural initiatives, including teaching food-forest gardening and traditional crop growing.
  • Sik-E-Dakh (Glen Vowell Band) — $35,000 for cultural food-security initiatives, including a root cellar, meat freezer and greenhouse for the community.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

“First Nation communities in the Northwest are benefitting from the First Nations Well Being Fund,” said Jennifer Rice, MLA for North Coast. “The projects developed by these communities will go a long way to promote community well-being, teach traditional food security methods and deliver skill development programs.”

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning. The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
  • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC B.C.’s Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc

A backgrounder follows.

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports northeastern First Nations

by admin

Four First Nation communities in northeastern B.C. will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nation communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous peoples experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations’ citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

Northeast projects:

  • Doig River First Nation — $32,125 to support mental health wellness by delivering a series of trauma workshops in the community, including language revitalization.
  • Prophet River First Nation — $25,000 to explore and define “community wellness and measures” by hosting a series of workshops and to deliver a draft community wellness plan.
  • Saulteau First Nations — $35,000 to strengthen local food security, building a community cooler and meat-cutting shack, and instruct youth in traditional food-preparation methods.
  • West Moberly First Nations — $35,000 to improve food security by delivering a series of community canning workshops over two years.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning. The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
  • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC B.C.’s Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc

A backgrounder follows.

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports Cariboo First Nations

by admin

Eight First Nation communities in the Cariboo will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nation communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous peoples experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations’ citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

Cariboo projects include:

  • ?Esdilagh First Nation – $35,000 to provide its members with training in stream keeping and monitoring fish waterways.
  • Lhtako Dené Nation – $35,000 to deliver a cultural camp for its members focusing on food security for the community.
  • Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation – $25,000, including technical support, to deliver planning sessions to further develop a community wellness plan.
  • Tŝideldel First Nation – $24,635 to deliver leadership workshops that will help develop and build a community wellness plan.
  • Williams Lake First Nation – $35,000 to develop a culture and knowledge exchange between elders and youth, and to build garden beds, a root cellar and a greenhouse for the community.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning. The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
  • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC B.C.’s Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc

A backgrounder follows.

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports Vancouver Island, coastal First Nations

by admin

Seventeen First Nation communities in Vancouver Island and the Coast will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nation communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous peoples experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations’ citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

Vancouver Island and Coastal projects include:

  • Esquimalt Nation — $35,000 to deliver culturally based mental health workshops for youth and adults.
  • Ka:yu:’k’t’h’ / Che:k’tles7et’h’ and Ucluelet First Nation — $52,278 to train youth and other band members in seafood harvesting, and deliver Knowledge Keeper lessons on the traditional Nuu-chah-nulth language.
  • Nuxalk First Nation near Bella Coola — $25,000 to deliver workshops in food security, wellness visioning and priority setting.
  • Quatsino First Nation in the village of Coal Harbour — $25,000 to deliver a series of community wellness dialogues.
  • Stz’uminus First Nation— $35,000 to build a community greenhouse and develop community programming to support food security.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

“First Nations communities around the province are working to reduce poverty and promote community well-being,” said Michele Babchuk, MLA for North Island. “This new funding will ensure that First Nations and Tribal Councils on Vancouver Island and the Coast can develop tools to plan and initiate a variety of projects that will benefit their communities.”

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning. The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
  • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC B.C.’s Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc

A backgrounder follows.

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports First Nations in the Kootenays

by admin

Two First Nation communities in the Kootenays will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nation communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous people experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

Kootenays projects:

  • ʔaq̓am (St. Mary’s First Nation) — $34,452 to deliver land-based training trips to teach traditional hunting, harvesting, fishing and canning methods, and update the community Strategic Plan.
  • Yaq̓it ʔa·knuqⱡi’I (Tobacco Plains Indian Band) — $35,000 for food security initiatives including a communal meat freezer, community kitchen and hide-preparation area.
  • Yaq̓it ʔa·knuqⱡi’I (Tobacco Plains Indian Band) — $25,000 to deliver workshops on active living, conduct surveys and develop a community well-being plan.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning.
    • The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
    • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC – British Columbia’s first-ever Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc  

A backgrounder follows.

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports First Nations on Lower Mainland, in southwestern B.C.

by admin

Twelve First Nations communities in the Lower Mainland and in southwestern B.C. will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nation communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous people experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

Lower Mainland and southwestern projects include:

  • Musqueam Nation — $35,000 to deliver wellness workshops for youth and Elders, and train suicide-prevention staff.
  • Skwah First Nation near Chilliwack — $35,000 to support local food-security initiatives and build a community garden with raised beds for the benefit of all members.
  • Squamish Nation — $35,000 for the Elders’ Centre Engagement Project that will focus on culturally sensitive mental-health wellness and engagement programs for Elders.
  • Tsal’alh Seton Lake Band — $23,000 to develop a community driven, cultural well-being plan through a series of engagement sessions.
  • Xaxli’p First Nation in Lillooet — $35,000 to improve local food security by planning, building and maintaining a community garden.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

“The First Nations Well Being Fund is part of government’s strategy to reduce poverty in British Columbia,” said Dan Coulter, MLA for Chilliwack. “These new grants support First Nations communities and Tribal Councils to develop plans and undertake local projects that will benefit their communities, on and off reserve.”

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning.
    • The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
    • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC – British Columbia’s first-ever Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc

A backgrounder follows.

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports Thompson Okanagan First Nations

by admin

Six First Nations communities in the Thompson Okanagan will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nations communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous people experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

Thompson Okanagan projects include:

  • Coldwater Indian Band — $32,257 to record traditional teachings and decolonization, and implement an Elders’ cultural and Knowledge-Keeping group.
  • Lower Similkameen Indian Band — $35,000 for food security initiatives, including food distribution and restoring a local greenhouse.
  • Lytton First Nation — $35,000 to develop and deliver training and skill-building programs around mobility and fall prevention for Elders in the community.
  • Okanagan Indian Band — $34,600 for food security initiatives in the community, including skill-building workshops, apiculture (beekeeping) training and a community garden.
  • Osoyoos Indian Band — $25,000 to deliver eight community-based sessions to develop and build a well-being plan for band members.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

“Local Indigenous leaders are improving community food security and delivering quality of life programs that support their members both on and off reserve,” said Roly Russell, MLA for Boundary Similkameen. “To me, improving well-being is the foundational goal that matters to us all, so I’m thrilled for these communities. When we work together to raise one another up, everyone in our communities is better off.”

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning.
    • The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
    • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC – British Columbia’s first-ever Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc  

A backgrounder follows.

6Oct

Well Being Fund supports First Nations in northern B.C.

by admin

Four First Nations communities in northern B.C. will be supported so they can complete well-being and poverty-reduction plans and projects in their communities, thanks to a grant from the First Nations Well Being Fund.

More than $2 million in grants has been provided to 62 First Nations communities throughout the province.

“All orders of government are finding ways of reducing poverty,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “I’m excited that through this funding, First Nations communities are able to develop projects that will improve individual well-being and benefit communities.”

The First Nations Well Being Fund is administered by the First Nations Public Service Secretariat, in partnership with the First Nations Leadership Council. It supports First Nations and Tribal Councils in their efforts to promote well-being, improve quality of life for community members on and off reserve, and reduce poverty at the community or Nation level.

“Numerous studies have shown that Indigenous peoples experience the highest levels of poverty, with a shocking 25% of Indigenous people in Canada living in poverty,” said Cheryl Casimer, political executive, First Nations Summit. “This poverty reduction initiative was created to assist B.C. First Nations to increase well-being within their communities and membership. This welcome program is a modest step toward addressing the disproportionally high rates of poverty for First Nations’ citizens in B.C. The program was very oversubscribed, which clearly shows there is a high demand for much-needed funding for these types of important community projects. We hope that the success of this initiative will lead to greater poverty reduction funding opportunities for our communities in the future.”

The B.C. government provided funding as part of TogetherBC, the Province’s poverty-reduction strategy.

Northern projects:

  • Cheslatta Carrier Nation — $35,000 to promote local food security, build a community fish camp and smokehouse, and teach traditional food canning methods.
  • Dease River First Nation — $35,000 to support local food security by building raised garden beds and providing plants and seeds for 30 community households.
  • Lheidli T’enneh First Nation — $34,850 to deliver training on traditional fishery techniques and a week-long cultural event focused on food preservation methods.
  • Takla Lake First Nation — $35,000 for food security, and cultural and wellness initiatives, including healing techniques, a smokehouse, and garden and gazebo for the community.

“As we continue the work to build and maintain strong relationships based on recognition and implementation of the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples, it’s good to know that many of the plans and projects being funded through the First Nations Well Being Fund are designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures and promote community well-being,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Applications to the first intake of the fund closed May 30, 2021. All B.C. First Nations were eligible to apply to the fund, which was created with a $2.7-million grant from the Province.

Quick Facts:

  • The Province has legislated targets to reduce the child poverty rate by 50% and the overall poverty rate by 25% by 2024.
  • B.C. was the first province in Canada to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into legislation, which was developed in collaboration and consultation with Indigenous partners.
  • The First Nations Well Being Fund has two funding streams: community projects and planning.
    • The community projects stream provides up to $35,000 for a single First Nation, $70,000 for two First Nations and $105,000 for regional applications of three or more partnering First Nations.
    • The planning stream provides $25,000 for one First Nation, $50,000 for two First Nations or $80,000 for a regional application involving three or more partnering First Nations.

Learn More:

First Nations Well Being Fund: https://fnps.ca/community-projects/wellbeingfund 

First Nations Public Service Secretariat: https://fnps.ca/

TogetherBC – British Columbia’s first-ever Poverty Reduction Strategy: http://gov.bc.ca/togetherbc

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