Posts Tagged "bc covid"

29Jul

17 ‘stranger attacks’ in just 2 weeks in Vancouver, police say, releasing video of an incident

by admin

VANCOUVER —
Officers are investigating an incident they say is just one of more than a dozen random assaults reported in Vancouver in the last few weeks.

Police said the incident was reported in the early morning hours of July 11, though the public was not notified until this week.

In a news release, the Vancouver Police Department said a man was walking home along Granville Street at about 3:30 a.m. that day when he was approached by a group of men.

Part of the incident was captured by a nearby security camera, according to the VPD, who released some of that video Thursday.

Police said the video shows a man pushed the victim down. Another helped the victim up, and the victim can be seen walking with the group toward a lane near Granville and Smithe Street.

The VPD said the victim was assaulted while in the lane, and his wallet was stolen.

And it does not appear to be an isolated incident.

According to VPD Const. Tania Visintin, “Stranger attacks have been prevalent in recent weeks throughout Vancouver and this is very concerning.”

The constable said there have been 17 “random assaults” reported across the city in the last two weeks alone.

Three suspects are all described as South Asian and in their early 20s.

The first is about 5’10” with short hair and “large ears,” the VPD said. At the time of the assault, he was wearing a white T-shirt, white pants and a green jacket, and carrying a black satchel across his chest.

Police described the second man as about 5’11” with a medium build and short dark hair. He was wearing a grey hooded sweater and black pants.

The third, according to police, is about 5’9″ with curly dark brown hair, and had on a white sweater and grey sweatpants the morning of July 11.

Police are seeking witnesses, as well as anyone who may recognize the men in the video.

“This happened around the time the bars closed on Granville Street. We know there were people still out and they may have seen what happened and can identify these men,” Visintin said.

“There is no excuse for anyone to get attacked for absolutely no reason.”

21Jul

‘Long COVID’ clinics expanding as thousands of British Columbians struggle with symptoms

by admin

VANCOUVER —
The number of new COVID-19 infections has dropped from its peak during the third wave, but the medical system is only now ramping up supports and medical treatment for thousands of British Columbians who continue to experience symptoms months after getting sick with the coronavirus.

Four post-COVID recovery clinics are now accepting patients in the Lower Mainland, offering teams of experts including lung specialists, psychologists, rheumatologists and physical therapists to better care for people experiencing the long-lasting effects of an illness that’s still being analyzed and unravelled. 

One of the leading doctors involved in treating “long COVID” patients says that while the multi-disciplinary approach may sound expensive, he believes it’ll actually be more cost-effective for the health-care system in the long-term.

“That’s the intention, to save a lot of money because instead of having an individual jump around from one specialist to the next in an uncoordinated way, we’re intending to do it and we’ve put these systms in place so that that care is better coordinated,” said Dr. Chris Carlsten, UBC’s head of respiratory medicine and Post-Covid Recovery Clinic lung specialist.

“People want to feel good, they want to work, they want to be productive, they want to be active … so it’s just a matter of trying to help them do that.” 

When the long-hauler clinics were first established last year, they were only taking COVID patients with the most debilitating post-infection symptoms. Since then, they have expanded and continue to grow with more funding; they are now accepting patients with a range of symptoms and severities.

The growing treatment options come as local researchers say it’s time we start changing how we think of the illness and the auto-antibody response that might be leading to the long-term symptoms.

“Initially, we thought of COVID-19 as a respiratory illness, but what we’ve learned is that this is a multi-system disease, affecting multiple organs — from the brain, heart, kidneys and liver to the gastrointestinal tract,” said Dr. Anita Palepu, UBC professor and head of the department of medicine, in a research update

SIGNIFICANT PERCENTAGE OF PATIENTS HAVE ONGOING SYMPTOMS

A precise definition and estimate of how many British Columbians could be struggling with lasting symptoms from the disease is hard to pinpoint. The symptoms are a topic of considerable debate in the medical community, and even the rough estimate that a third of people who’ve had COVID will have symptoms lasting three months after their initial infections is imprecise at best. 

Symptoms can include typical hallmarks of COVID-19 (coughing, tightness in the chest, difficulty breathing), brain fog, fatigue and difficulty concentrating; loss of taste and smell may be lingering effects, but aren’t the focus of the recovery clinics.

A referral from a physician is required for care

Even with a conservative estimate, some 40,000 British Columbians are likely still experiencing symptoms from their infection months later, with varying impacts on their quality of life. Carlsten points out that the one-third ballpark estimate is for those who’ve had symptoms. 

“There’s so many people that are infected that are not symptomatic at all, some of whom don’t even know they were infected,” he said.

Some people who weren’t seriously sick have had their symptoms stick around for a year or more, he added, while others who’ve been hospitalized have made full recoveries, so there’s no clear pattern about who will be grappling with the symptoms long-term.

LIVING WITH LONG COVID

While some who technically have long COVID may see their lingering symptoms as little more than an annoyance, for others, the consequences have been debilitating.

Vancouver resident Katy McLean had been very physically and socially active before catching the virus last September, but the 43 year-old now needs a walker and had to stop working and go on disability support.

“I had what seemed like fatigue and a head cold at the beginning, then lost my sense of smell on day nine,” she told CTV News, explaining that while her initial illness improved after a month, she relapsed in the spring and spent three months unable to get out of bed.

“I compare it to a bad hangover when you’re just dizzy, you’re sick, you’re so tired, you can’t do anything – you can’t think straight,” she said. “You feel foggy and cognitively impaired.”

Describing her illness as like a rollercoaster, McLean says her worst days come with shortness of breath and heart palpitations. She’s also developed chronic fatigue syndrome and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), which has turned her feet a purplish colour and prevents her from standing for more than a few minutes, even if she had the energy to stand longer.

“It’s isolating,” said McLean, crediting her live-in partner for supporting her through her illness.

“I could’ve never imagined 10.5 months later I’d still be in this situation with my mobility impaired and on disability, unable to work, unable to socialize.”

The Provincial Health Services Authority now has resources for patients and doctors alike to research what medical professionals have been able to learn about the long-term effects of COVID-19. 

GETTING HELP

The impacts of isolation and de facto lockdowns have affected everyone, whether they’ve stifled personal relationships and connections or left people feeling depressed and stressed out. But, Carlsten says mood disorders shouldn’t be confused with the low energy and brain fog so many long-haulers are experiencing.

“It’s not just depression and mood. A lot of the manifestations of COVID couldn’t be explained by that at all,” said the lung specialist, pointing to a CT scan of COVID-ravaged lungs, predominantly white from damage and scarring.

“You can imagine how if your lungs are so affected by that, it’s so easily visible, what that can do to your oxygen levels and when you have oxygen levels that are compromised, it’s not a stretch to think you can’t think clearly,” Carlsten said.

While the PHSA’s website indicates the clinics will only treat people with a confirmed COVID diagnosis or positive serology test, the practitioners are more lenient, acknowledging many people may have self-isolated with symptoms without getting tested, particularly when testing was in short supply.

“Admittedly, that has been a difficult question for us, because you can imagine the mountain it opens,” said Carlsten. “We’ve been working with the government to get the resources for that, and more recently they’ve been forthcoming. So, as those resources come, we’ll expand the eligibility and we certainly don’t believe a positive test is the only way to establish that you’ve had COVID.”

McLean is grateful there are more supports and hopes there will be more awareness about a condition that’s misunderstood and often unrecognized by people who haven’t experienced it themselves.

“There’s not a lot of attention on this because a lot of us are off into the shadows,” she said. “We’re not in the world anymore, we’re not participating in socializing or the workforce or anything, we’re just at home trying to get better.” 

14Jul

Requiring proof of vaccination allowed in ‘limited circumstances,’ says B.C.’s human rights commissioner

by admin

VANCOUVER —
There are “limited circumstances” in which businesses and service providers can require people to provide proof of vaccination, according to new guidance from B.C.’s human rights commissioner.

Kasari Govender’s guidance, published online this week, stresses that vaccination status policies should only be implemented if “less intrusive means of preventing COVID-19 transmission are inadequate for the setting and if due consideration is given to the human rights of everyone involved.”

The document doesn’t outline specific scenarios that would justify a proof-of-vaccine requirement, but does indicate any such policies should be based on evidence of a transmission risk in a particular setting.

In approaching the thorny issue, Govender weighed the importance of upholding individual rights while also protecting the collective rights to health and safety – which the commissioner acknowledged has been a difficult balancing act throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

“No one’s safety should be put at risk because of others’ personal choices not to receive a vaccine,” the guidance reads.

“Just as importantly, no one should experience harassment or unjustifiable discrimination when there are effective alternatives to vaccination status policies.”

The commissioner said any policies that treat people differently based on vaccination status must “remain consistent” with the B.C. Human Rights Code, which offers protections to a number of classes, including people with a disability.

Vaccination status policies should also be time-limited – meaning they are implemented for as short a period as possible, and regularly reviewed based on health advice and the state of the pandemic – and be “proportional to the health and safety risks they seek to address,” according to the document.

The commissioner said business and service providers should also keep in mind that any collection, use or disclosure of personal health information such as vaccination status must abide by privacy laws.

Last week, while B.C. was relaxing visitation rules at long-term care homes, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said the government would not be requiring workers in those facilities to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Those employees will need to continue wearing masks and adhering to other prevention measures such as “being tested for COVID-19 using rapid tests three times a week,” Henry said.

Henry also announced plans to issue a new public health order requiring long-term care homes to provide the names and personal health numbers of all staff, residents and volunteers, which will be used to determine vaccination rates at each facility and outbreak risks. ‘

Health officials have long warned that seniors are much more vulnerable to falling seriously ill or even dying after catching COVID-19.

To read the full document, “A human rights approach to proof of vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic,” click here.

9Jul

B.C. businesses added to social media ‘blacklist’ for encouraging mask use

by admin

VANCOUVER —
Even though masks are no longer legally mandated in B.C. malls and stores, many businesses continue to encourage mask use for the safety of customers and staff – and that decision is getting them named and shamed on a social media blacklist.

In the private Facebook group Whitelist Blacklist BC Only, users derisively describe masks as “face diapers,” and call the people who advocate for their use during the COVID-19 pandemic “maskholes.”

They also spread the word about which businesses are still requesting that customers cover their mouths and noses in the absence of a province-wide mandate to do so.

Targets include everything from massive casinos to the Wedge Cheesery, a small cheese shop that Matt MacLaren and his wife run in Vernon, a community of about 40,000 people located in the province’s Southern Interior.

The couple learned about the blacklist a few days ago after a barrage of rude comments and anti-masker memes started showing up on the Wedge Cheesery Facebook page.

“We found out about this group where they were posting about people and blacklisting their businesses and saying a whole bunch of nasty things while they’re at it – really childish things, childish behaviour from fully grown adults,” MacLaren told CTV News.

The shop’s website boasts cheese offerings from around the world, cheese tastings with wine, and a goal of bringing “outstanding service, cheese and smiles” to the community.

So what drew so much negative attention? A Facebook post from Wedge Cheesery that said staff would “greatly appreciate” if customers continue to wear a mask for the time being.

MacLaren said none of the shop’s employees are fully vaccinated yet because of their age, and he wanted to make sure they were protected.

“We weren’t in full agreeance, I think, with the mask mandate being lifted,” he said. “We also wanted to make sure our workers felt safe, and so we had a discussion with the manager and we decided that we wouldn’t make it a mandatory thing, but we would appreciate if people still did wear masks in the shop.”

The response in the blacklist group, which has about 2,100 members, was swift.

“Go to hell!”

“Everyone needs to stop shopping there.”

“True colours shining through.”

“I’ll be sure to #boycottwedgechersery” (sic)

“No cheese is good enough to make me wear a mask to buy it.”

The cheese shop’s Facebook post, which has since been deleted, said management would keep encouraging mask use until federal officials declare the COVID-19 crisis over, or until “everyone” is vaccinated, including children under the age of 12.

Several members of the blacklist group were aghast at the suggestion, though manufacturers are currently studying the use of COVID-19 vaccines in younger children, and just this week chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam warned that outbreaks among unvaccinated children will be “a reality going forward.”

Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization already recommends that everyone age six months and older receive the annual flu vaccine, with a few rare exceptions.

MacLaren said the meaning behind the shop’s message was misconstrued – they never intended to imply that every single person has to get the COVID-19 vaccine – but it was too late. Before anyone reached out to clarify the shop’s position, the pile-on began.

Beyond the comments, some people left one-star reviews for the Wedge Cheesery online, which MacLaren said is the last thing businesses need after enduring the last 16 months of the pandemic.

“To say I don’t agree with a business’s policy – which is, I feel, a relatively normal policy considering the times we’re in – and blacklist that business because of it, that’s just insane. That’s ridiculous,” he said. “You’re hurting local businesses, the local economy.”

Some of the blacklist group users are under the impression that it’s now against the law for B.C. businesses to require masks, given that the Ministry of Public Safety replaced its mandate with an indoor mask recommendation on July 1.

That’s not the case. Asked about the legality of requiring masks, a ministry spokesperson directed CTV News to the B.C. Centre for Disease Control’s website, which states that “private businesses have a right to refuse entry to customers not wearing a mask,” and can instead provide curbside pickup options or advise people to shop online.

Businesses do have a responsibility to accommodate customers who can’t wear a mask for reasons related to a disability or medical condition, according to the BCCDC. The Ministry of Public Safety also recommends businesses that choose to require masks make some exceptions, including for children under 12.

Failure to accomodate people with legitimate medical conditions can result in a human rights complaint, though a ruling from the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal earlier this year cautioned that anyone claiming discrimination over mask policies will be required to prove they are unable to wear one.

Some of the blacklist group members do cite health conditions for their inability to wear a mask. Many others consider mask use the behaviour of “zombies” and “sheep.”

In the end, MacLaren said his business ended up getting a minor boost from the online attacks. He shared their story in a local COVID-19 information group, also on Facebook, and received a heartwarming outpouring of support.

“A ton of people left five-star reviews on our Google page after reading what happened – and they’re actual supporters of our shop, people who have been inside,” he said. “Actual customers.”

6Jul

Shots at the beach: White Rock pop-up clinic targets the unvaccinated

by admin

WHITE ROCK, B.C. —
Sun worshippers on their way to the water passed by a pop-up vaccination clinic at Crescent Beach in White Rock on Tuesday, where staff wore colourful leis and Hawaiian shirts.

“Our idea is that with this warm weather, people are going to enjoy the beach. And we wanted to make a clinic as accessible as possible for everyone,” said Megan Nilson with the Fraser Health mobile vaccination team.

There were 250 Pfizer doses up for grabs, no appointment necessary.

“There are gaps we are seeing in the community, and I think one of those gaps are youth, and so it makes perfect sense. Where are the youth going to be in the summer? Probably on the beach,” said Dr. Birinder Narang, the co-founder of the “This is Our Shot” campaign.

While the beach clinic was focused on attracting people who hadn’t yet had their first shot, second doses were also available if there was capacity, for patients at least seven weeks past their first vaccine.

Shaun Ruetz and Dan McColl both dropped in for their second shots.

“This was great, I liked it. It was more convenient than going to an arranged site, because here I am, and it’s done,” said McColl.

“Other than the parking issues, it’s fantastic. It’s definitely more cheerful to come down here,” said Ruetz. “I think if they make it more accessible and make it seem like, oh, I’m wandering by here I’ll get the shot. It’s right here, why not?”

Narang said the majority of people at drop-in clinics are there for second doses. “However, every single first dose that we get in these clinics will still help the community,” he added.

Around 22 per cent of eligible British Columbians still haven’t had their first dose. Narang acknowledges it will be difficult to convince some of them.

“It’s definitely harder to reach the people who have fixed belief around conspiracy and their thought behind the whole vaccination process and COVID,” he said.

But he believes B.C. can get over 80 per cent of eligible residents vaccinated, and casual, drop-in clinics like the one at Crescent Beach can help with that goal.

“I think convenience and accessibility will be a key to this,” said Narang.

There were nurses and clinic staff on hand to answer questions at the beach clinic, for people who were hesitant, but not completely opposed to vaccination.

“We want our clinics to be accessible for all those who are eligible, and so this is one of the examples that Fraser Health is doing in the community to reach that last 20 per cent,” said Nilsen.

There will be another pop-up beachside clinic at Cultus Lake on Friday.

6Jul

Shots at the beach: Surrey pop-up clinic targets the unvaccinated

by admin

WHITE ROCK, B.C. —
Sun worshippers on their way to the water passed by a pop-up vaccination clinic at Crescent Beach in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday, where staff wore colourful leis and Hawaiian shirts.

“Our idea is that with this warm weather, people are going to enjoy the beach. And we wanted to make a clinic as accessible as possible for everyone,” said Megan Nilson with the Fraser Health mobile vaccination team.

There were 250 Pfizer doses up for grabs, no appointment necessary.

“There are gaps we are seeing in the community, and I think one of those gaps are youth, and so it makes perfect sense. Where are the youth going to be in the summer? Probably on the beach,” said Dr. Birinder Narang, the co-founder of the “This is Our Shot” campaign.

While the beach clinic was focused on attracting people who hadn’t yet had their first shot, second doses were also available if there was capacity, for patients at least seven weeks past their first vaccine.

Shaun Ruetz and Dan McColl both dropped in for their second shots.

“This was great, I liked it. It was more convenient than going to an arranged site, because here I am, and it’s done,” said McColl.

“Other than the parking issues, it’s fantastic. It’s definitely more cheerful to come down here,” said Ruetz. “I think if they make it more accessible and make it seem like, oh, I’m wandering by here I’ll get the shot. It’s right here, why not?”

Narang said the majority of people at drop-in clinics are there for second doses. “However, every single first dose that we get in these clinics will still help the community,” he added.

Around 22 per cent of eligible British Columbians still haven’t had their first dose. Narang acknowledges it will be difficult to convince some of them.

“It’s definitely harder to reach the people who have fixed belief around conspiracy and their thought behind the whole vaccination process and COVID,” he said.

But he believes B.C. can get over 80 per cent of eligible residents vaccinated, and casual, drop-in clinics like the one at Crescent Beach can help with that goal.

“I think convenience and accessibility will be a key to this,” said Narang.

There were nurses and clinic staff on hand to answer questions at the beach clinic, for people who were hesitant, but not completely opposed to vaccination.

“We want our clinics to be accessible for all those who are eligible, and so this is one of the examples that Fraser Health is doing in the community to reach that last 20 per cent,” said Nilsen.

There will be another pop-up beachside clinic at Cultus Lake on Friday.

6Jul

Heat wave deaths in Fraser Health nearly double compared to B.C. average

by admin

VANCOUVER —
Hundreds of British Columbians died after a stifling heat wave gripped the province in record-breaking temperatures and new data shows that twice as many residents in Fraser Health died compared to the provincial average. 

Newly-released statistics from the BC Coroners Service shows that while there were nearly 300 per cent more people who died in the province compared to the five-year average from June 25 to July 1 – in Fraser Health that number skyrocketed to nearly 600 per cent.

When averaged out, 198 people typically died during the last week of June in British Columbia, but during the punishing heat dome, that number rose to 777, representing 579 excess deaths in the province. In Fraser Health, the average is 50 people who die during that week, but this year there were 344; a 582 per cent increase.

In Vancouver Coastal Health, which has a smaller population (1.25 million) than Fraser Health (1.8 million), an average of 45 people die in the last week of June, but this year 193 did; a 329 per cent increase. This year Interior Health, Northern Health and the Vancouver Island Health authorities saw increases of 123 to 138 per cent of their five-year averages during that time.

CTV News has reached out to Fraser Health and the city of Surrey, the health authority’s largest city, to discuss the statics and planning efforts for future extreme heat events but has not yet been granted an interview.

VANCOUVER ALREADY CONDUCTING A REVIEW AMID RECOMMENDATIONS

While Vancouver saw comparatively fewer deaths than its suburbs and Fraser Valley, the city is already conducting a review of its existing heat response measures as the city’s planning commissioners have sent a memo to the city council and the managers of the city, park board and various civic departments in an effort to mitigate future deaths due to extreme temperatures.

The nine-page document dated July 5 has a series of short-term and longer-term suggestions that “should prioritize historically under-served areas and populations that have been harmed by systemic oppression and inequitable policies and wealth inequality.”

Among the priorities the Vancouver City Planning Commission advocates for in “Climate Emergency: Extreme Heat and Air Quality Mitigation” are emergency alerts to phones in a variety of languages and more widespread communication of the risks and emergency response measures on various media channels and even signage at bus stops and grocery stores.

The commission’s short-term suggestions include opening beaches, pools and public washrooms 24 hours per day during heat waves, using buses as cooling stations, planting trees to offer shade and providing more covered and shaded outdoor seating, more temporary washrooms, charging stations and Wi-Fi access near shade or cooling stations, air conditioning in lobbies of social housing and congregate care settings, temporary hotel rooms for the homeless (particularly seniors or living with a disability), transportation to cooling centres, as well as air purifiers with priority for the disabled and elderly.

Suggestions for multi-height water fountains, cooling and misting stations were already incorporated into the city of Vancouver’s response to the heat wave, and the city is continuing to direct people to air conditioned libraries and community centres even though the temperatures have largely returned to normal. 

Long-term recommendations include ensuring accessible seating and access to shady areas in parks, widening sidewalks, investing in pop-up cooling and clean-air tents, more water fountains and water parks, more accessible public washrooms, and air conditioning for social and congregate housing units.

A city of Vancouver spokesperson says the document will be considered as part of a review its initiated into the heat event.

“The first phase of this review will take place within the next two weeks, based on preliminary data available now,” they said in an email. “We will also be analysing more detailed data from BC Coroners as this is made available over the coming months, to more meaningfully assess who is most impacted and what supports are needed for future extreme heat events.”

6Jul

2 men tried to lure 3 kids into a car on Sunday, say Abbotsford police

by admin

VANCOUVER —
The Abbotsford Police Department is investigating a possible child luring attempt.

In a statement, the department said that three kids were playing at a park at 36232 Lower Sumas Mountain Road on Sunday when two men are alleged to have approached them around 7:30 p.m.

“While playing, two adult men approached the youth and engaged in conversation,” reads the statement, released by Sgt. Judy Baird.

“One of the males said he was a professional hockey player and knew the children’s mother.”

During the conversation, one of the men is alleged to have invited the kids to get in his car and drive to his house where, he said, there would be other children to play with.

“The eldest child was uncomfortable with the conversation, grabbed her siblings and ran home to tell their parents,” reads the statement.

One suspect is described as a white man of medium build, in his 30s, and about 5’9”. He has short brown hair, with three stripes shaved on each side of his head, and was wearing a grey hoody, navy blue jogging pants, black running shoes, and carrying two hockey sticks.

The second suspect is described as a South Asian man with short dark hair and a goatee. He was wearing a black T-shirt, white shorts, black flip-flops and had a tattoo on his upper right arm.

The second suspect is “associated with” a small black, four-door sedan with tinted windows.

Anyone with CCTV or dashcam footage of this area or who has information about the incident is asked to call the Abbotsford Police Department at 604-859-5225 and quote file number 2021-29234. 

24Jun

Vancouver restaurant sees 3 dine-and-dash incidents in 1 month

by admin

VANCOUVER —
It’s been a bittersweet few weeks for Amar Maroke. The Vancouver restaurant owner installed his outdoor patio at Four Olives Restaurant at the start of June, but since then, he’s had three incidents of customers dining and dashing.

After the first two, Maroke decided to install a security camera outside. The third incident, which happened around 3 p.m. Saturday, was recorded.

In the video, a man can be seen seated on the patio. Maroke says the customers ordered a couple of beers and a full meal, totalling about $75. As a family walks past on the sidewalk, the man stands up from his seat, walks with the family and leaves.

“It hasn’t happened often, maybe once a year inside, but outside it’s been three times in one month,” Maroke said. “That’s probably $200 in one month … What can you do? Do you have a choice? You can’t run after them.”

Maroke says each time a customer ran off without paying their bill there was only one server working.

Ian Tostenson, president of the B.C. Restaurant and Food Services Association, believes the staff shortage could be a contributing factor.

“You could just survey the situation and see there’s not really anyone supervising, so you could eat, drink and get out of there,” Tostenson said.

Across B.C., the service industry is short about 40,000 workers, both front-of-house and back, according to Tostenson.

He says many people left the industry during the pandemic because work was unstable. Others are afraid to comeback due to COVID concerns, and others are working “minimal hours” to still receive federal benefits, such as the Canada Recovery Benefit, or CRB, Tostenson said.

When it comes to incidents of dining and dashing, Tostenson says there has not been a significant increase.

“It’s popping to the surface a bit more than normal; we haven’t talked about dine and dash for years,” he said. “But thank god it’s not at pandemic levels, if you will.”

His simple message to restaurant-goers is to “stop being a jerk.”

“Go enjoy yourselves, but pay your bill too,” he said. 

24Jun

Ontario man charged in violent attack on B.C. teenager with autism

by admin

VANCOUVER —
A young man has been charged nearly a year after an assault on a teenager in Richmond, B.C.

Mounties in the Metro Vancouver city announced Thursday that Dominic Rallon Jao has been charged with assault with bodily harm.

Jao, 21, is a resident of Ontario, the RCMP said in a news release.

His charge stems from an incident on the evening of Aug. 21, 2020.

It was reported that a teen with autism was playing basketball with a group of people in Richmond when he was assaulted.

The alleged assault was reported to police by two witnesses, but by the time the officers reached the scene, the victim was gone.

He was located in a nearby hospital with significant injuries.

About a week after the assault, which police called “unprovoked,” the victim’s family spoke to CTV News about the violent attack on the 18-year-old.

His family said the teen was playing basketball at Richmond Secondary School at the time. They said the teen was accused by his attacker of being too loud.

His friends, according to the family, explained that the teen has a developmental disability, and encouraged the attacker to let it go.

Instead, the teen was left with a badly split lip that needed stitches, lacerations and abrasions on his neck and arms, and a concussion.

The family said the teen left the scene of the attack and made his way home, where they found him disoriented, covered in blood and unable to explain what happened.

His parents took him to hospital, where he was later located by Mounties. It was police who explained to the victim’s parents what had happened.

“Speaking to the victim’s father it’s evident the profound impact this incident has had on their family,” Richmond RCMP Cpl. Adriana O’Malley said in a statement Thursday.

“This was felt by our investigators who worked tirelessly throughout this investigation to support and, in the words of the victim’s father, ‘create a mental comfort zone’ for his son.”

Back in August, police told CTV News they’d identified a suspect, but that charges had not been laid as they appealed for more witnesses to come forward.

The allegation against Jao has not been proven in court.

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