Posts Tagged "stolen"

5Jan

Man left housebound after wheelchair stolen from apartment building

by admin

VICTORIA —
A 75-year-old man who has a disability is now housebound after his custom wheelchair was stolen from his apartment building in James Bay.

Priya Diddee bought the wheelchair for her father and tells CTV News Vancouver Island she was in disbelief when she couldn’t find it on Thursday morning.

“The retail value of this chair is around $6,000,” she said. “I got it second hand, so I got a really good deal. The controls are on the left because he only has use of his left hand.”

They leave his wheelchair in a room off the lobby in their apartment building on Simcoe Street, but when she went to get the wheelchair Thursday, it was gone.

“I plugged it in the night before … and came back to pick it up the next morning to take him to watch the Star Wars movie and it was gone,” said Priya.

Her father, who goes by the name J.K., said he thought to himself, “Does that mean I am stuck inside the house?”

The custom wheelchair allows him to explore Victoria after two strokes left him disabled.

“I don’t know what type of desperation that person would be facing in their life,” he said of the thief.

Priya said the person would have needed a key to get into the building or would have had to sneak in with someone.

“I’m shocked, in disbelief and angry,” she said. “Who steals from a disabled person? Why would anybody need a chair like that unless they had disabilities?”

Victoria police said they are investigating and hope to be able to return the wheelchair to the Diddee family.

“Often, thefts like this don’t target the chair itself, but the components like batteries and electric motors,” said VicPD spokesperson Bowen Osoko.

Police say the wheelchair is a JAZZY make with the model number 1113 ats. It also has a distinguishable BC Transit sticker on the front of the chair.

“We’d very much like to reunite Mr. Diddee with his only mode of transportation,” said Osoko.

Priya said he will now be stuck at home alone for the next five days while she is working.

“They robbed my father of his independence,” she said.

A stranger reached out to Priya offering to make a GoFundMe campaign so they could purchase a new wheelchair.

“It’s heartwarming to see the community coming together,” said Osoko.

Anyone who recognizes the chair or has information about the theft is being asked to call police at 250-995-7654. 

2Jan

TransLink driver has bus stolen during a bathroom break

by admin


The N19 bus was stolen around 2 a.m. from outside the Surrey Central Station


Francis Georgian / PNG

A 28-year-old man was arrested after a TransLink bus taken for a joyride through Surrey early Thursday morning.

The Metro Vancouver Transit Police say the N19 bus was stolen around 2 a.m. outside the Surrey Central Station while the driver was taking a bathroom break.

“The operator went inside to use the washroom and when he came out the bus was no longer there,” said Transit police Sgt. Clint Hampton. “He reported it to police right away.”

Police were able to track the stolen bus using GPS.

The bus, which was empty at the time of the theft, was stopped with the help of Surrey RCMP around 2:15 a.m. at 176th Street and Fraser Highway, about 10 kilometres away.

Hampton said it was lucky that no one was injured and the bus was not damaged.

A man, whose name has not been released, remains in custody. It’s expected he’ll be charged with theft of a motor vehicle over $5,000.

Alcohol is not believed to have been a factor.

“I don’t believe there was any impairment but there may be some mental health issues, but that will be part of the investigation,” said Hampton.

31Dec

14 of the strangest things stolen in Canada in 2019

by admin

TORONTO —
There is a saying in the news industry that “dog bites man” is not a story but “man bites dog” is, because reporting is about telling stories that go beyond the ordinary.

Stolen vehicles are usually an example of “dog bites man” news. If that vehicle is full of milk or Blundstones, though, it’s veering into “man bites dog” territory. Ditto if it’s a food truck or if it left tracks that made it easy to find.

And while break-ins at homes and businesses are unfortunately common, odds are they’ll only get news coverage if the thief makes off with something unusual, such as antique chainsaws or used cooking oil or an entire kitchen.

In that spirit, we’ve put together a look at some of the strangest thefts reported to Canadian police services in 2019.

From a large amount of water to a little bit of sand, the stories on this list prove that solving crime is never a day at the beach.

‘OLD TOWN ROAD’ SIGNS

The song of the summer provided a small community in B.C. with an unexpected bout of entrepreneurship.

Lil Nas X’s ‘Old Town Road’ climbed the charts in record-breaking fashion, fuelled in part by controversy over its removal from Billboard’s ranking of country songs.

As the song’s popularity grew, so did the rate of disappearance of street signs along an actual Old Town Road in Sicamous, B.C.

Realizing that there was a demand for the signs, community leaders started selling them for $25 apiece. Officials said they sold some to people from as far away as Las Vegas and Belize.

ICEBERG WATER

At industrial scales, iceberg water is primarily used to make products such as vodka and cosmetics.

Given that, one can forgive Iceberg Vodka for believing that the water held in tanks at its warehouse in Port Union, N.L. would be safe from bandits.

But that wasn’t the case. One of its tanks was drained over a weekend while the warehouse was closed, and thieves made off with about 30,000 litres of iceberg water – enough to fill a tractor-trailer or to make 150,000 bottles of vodka.

A SNUGGLING GOAT

When a farm on Vancouver Island opened its doors for a baby goat-snuggling event, its owners never suspected that one of the snugglers would turn out to be a smuggler.

But that’s exactly what happened at a farm in Ladysmith, B.C., in April.

As the farm’s owner was packing up from the event, he realized that one of the baby goats was missing. Only 12 days old, the goat was still surviving on milk from its mother.

B.C. was home to a number of bizarre animal thefts this year, including a juvenile snake and a litter of shih tzu puppies.

A FENCING MASK SIGNED BY THE CAST OF ‘THE PRINCESS BRIDE’

The only word to describe this case is “inconceivable.”

Jaspaul Sandhu’s car was stolen in July from a parking lot in Calgary.

The auto theft would have been bad enough on its own, but Sandhu had left a number of rare items inside, including fencing and rock climbing equipment and a priceless possession – a fencing mask signed by cast members from the 1987 movie “The Princess Bride.”

BOB BELL’S BELL

A quiet intersection outside Edmonton has been known as “Bell’s Corner” for decades. It got its name from the Bell family, who have long maintained a farm on one corner.

A large bell was hung at the intersection in 2008 by Bob Bell, as a tribute to his grandparents. Dating back to 1903, the 320-kilogram bell had previously spent half a century at a church and then another 20 years outside Bell’s car dealership.

The bell was swiped from its home in April. Local police said it was the first time they were aware of a bell being stolen in the area.

 

A LOT OF ALCOHOL

Alcohol thefts aren’t exactly rare. One Alberta liquor store chain estimated that it dealt with more than 18 thefts per day last year. More recently, Ontario’s liquor retail operator has ramped up security at some of its most frequently targeted stores, while its Manitoba counterpart has started naming and shaming people accused of stealing from it.

Some thefts, though, manage to stand out. Take the man who was accused of stealing $58,000 worth of alcohol from stores in Toronto over a little more than a year, or the case of a tractor-trailer full of beer stolen elsewhere in Ontario.

Thieves in Vancouver in June were less lucky. They thought they were stealing 22 bottles of liquor from a bartending school, but soon discovered that it was only coloured water.

THE MAKINGS OF A MEAL

Much like alcohol thefts, heists involving meat aren’t exactly uncommon – but sometimes the scale or circumstances of the crime are weird enough to make it newsworthy.

This year in Ontario alone, steaks were stolen from a family’s barbecue and a Royal Canadian Legion branch’s freezerful of meat was nabbed.

Lobster is a common target for East Coast thieves; 60 pounds of it was swiped off of a boat in February, and 48 crates – worth an estimated $25,000 – were taken from a P.E.I. storage facility and later recovered.

Far more valuable than the lobster was the $187,000 cheese shipment that was allegedly picked up by a stranger with fake paperwork.

For dessert, all of the thieves described above might want to connect with those who pilfered 250 chocolate bars or 100 ice cream sandwiches.

A DUNK TANK

Ashtin Anderson has the same question about this story as all of us: “Who would steal a dunk tank?”

That’s exactly what happened in Boyle, Alta. in July. The local agricultural society had rented the dunk tank to use in a fundraiser. The event was apparently successful, as organizers didn’t get to bed until 3:30 a.m.

When the first organizer returned at 6 a.m., though, the tank had vanished.

A photo circulated on social media showing people playing in the tank after-hours, seemingly still in the same spot it was during the fundraiser, but that evidence was not enough to solve the mystery.

ELECTRICITY

Giving a key to a trusted neighbour before leaving for vacation is a good way to get peace of mind – except in this case.

A resident of Tillsonburg, Ont. returned home in August after a lengthy absence and discovered an extension cord running from their home into their neighbour’s.

The neighbour was charged with theft of electricity. Stealing or wasting electricity or gas carries the same criminal penalty as any other form of theft.

A PECULIAR PILLOW

It isn’t what was stolen that made a September heist in West Vancouver unusual – it’s what happened next.

Police officers responding to a report of a bag of tools stolen from a construction site decided to search a nearby forest.

Inside the forest, they allegedly found a man sleeping on the ground, with his head resting on the very tools that had been reported stolen.

He was arrested for possession of stolen property and unrelated offences.

SHORTY AND OTHER STATUES

Shorty, a small statue of a sailor caricature, quickly became a popular attraction after it was placed in Peggy’s Cove, N.S. in 2018.

The statue vanished from its home in April – but unlike many of the capers we’re describing, this one had a happy ending.

Students from Dalhousie University contacted Shorty’s owner, telling her they had found the statue in a house in Halifax in what they believed was “a prank gone wrong.”

Shorty was returned to Peggy’s Cove and soon joined by a Mrs. Shorty.

Other prominent statue thefts this year include the head from a statue of St. Vladimir outside a church in Winnipeg, a giant head from a tourist attraction in P.E.I., a sculpture of a nude woman at a Vancouver art gallery, and a large golden egg from a Salvador Dali piece in Vancouver.

A BIG PUMPKIN

A Halloween-season theft at a fruit stand in B.C. was neither a trick nor a treat.

Penticton farmer Parmjeet Dhaliwal said her “masterpiece” 40-kilogram pumpkin was snatched just before she had planned to carve it.

Surveillance camera photos showed two people looking at the pumpkin, but it was not clear if they were responsible for the theft. Dhaliwal said it was the second time she’d been hit by pumpkin thieves.

A pumpkin theft in Calgary a few weeks earlier left a four-year-old girl upset, as the gourd had been growing in her garden all summer. Two waste management workers heard about that theft and responded by hand-delivering two pumpkins to the girl’s home.

BEACH SAND

Whether a beach is public or private, somebody owns it – and that means nothing there is free for the taking.

That lesson was learned by a beachgoer in Port Stanley, Ont., who was approached by police after they allegedly noticed him filling a bucket with sand.

Police say the man told them he was going to take the sand home and use it to level stones in his garden.

They responded that if he wanted to avoid a theft charge, he should purchase sand legally.

NOTHING

It was the perfect setup for a crime of opportunity: A supermarket in Kingston, Ont. was accidentally left unlocked overnight.

With no employees around, it would have been easy for any would-be thieves to abscond with cartfuls of meat, baby food, razors and other valuable goods.

Although plenty of people had the chance, wandering into the store and realizing nobody could stop them, not a single item was reported stolen.

After reviewing security camera footage, the store’s manager said it was clear the customers all left the supermarket after they realized it wasn’t supposed to be open.

14Oct

Liberal and Conservative campaigns say signs being stolen in South Vancouver

by admin

VANCOUVER – With one week to go before the federal election, both the Liberal and Conservative parties say their campaign signs are going missing in the Vancouver South riding.

Conservative candidate Wai Young’s campaign claims more than 30 per cent of their lawn signs have been stolen in the riding. In an emailed news release, Young called the alleged thefts “hurtful and dangerous.”

“I worry about our democracy,” Young said, while a lawyer for the Young campaign, implied the Liberal campaign or its supporters were responsible, without providing proof.

Young’s campaign has not responded to requests for comment from CTV News to further explain that claim or back it up with evidence.

The riding’s Liberal candidate, Harjit Sajjan, who beat Young in the riding in 2015, strongly denied that any of his supporters are responsible for vandalism or theft of other candidates’ signs.

“I find it very disappointing that Wai Young’s campaign is making baseless accusations on us,” said Sajjan outside his campaign office Monday.

“Especially since some of our signs have been stolen.”

Both campaigns provided CTV News Vancouver with security camera footage they say shows people stealing their signs.

In what appears to be home surveillance video provided by Young’s campaign, a car can be seen pulling up outside a house after dark. The passenger exits the vehicle and removes a small sign from the lawn in front of the home.

The video is timestamped Oct. 9 at 11:55 p.m., but it’s difficult to see the name on the sign. Nothing in the video, which appears to have been edited to remove the moment the person pulls out the sign, indicates who the alleged perpetrator might be or his or her motive.

The video provided by the Sajjan campaign is also recorded after dark and shows someone approach a large sign on foot, struggling for a moment to remove it from its base, before carrying it down the street over their head.

In their news release, Young’s campaign says it has reported sign thefts to Elections Canada.

The Sajjan campaign says it is documenting each incident and plans to formally complain to Elections Canada at a later date, but stopped short of blaming any specific campaign or individuals.

7Oct

‘I just need my legs back’: Stolen wheelchair leaves Vancouverite homebound | CBC News

by admin

Romham Gallacher was getting set to leave home on Saturday morning when it became apparent something was horribly wrong. 

The shed where Gallacher, who uses the pronouns they/them, keeps their motorized wheelchair had been broken into. The wheelchair was gone, along with its charger. 

“I panicked,” Gallacher said over the phone from their home. “I honestly don’t know what I’m what I’m going to do.”

Gallacher quickly created some flyers to share on social media, and filed a police report in hope of recuperating the $4,000 wheelchair as quickly as possible. 

CBC News contacted the Vancouver police about the missing chair but did not get an immediate response.

‘I can’t go do anything’

At home in East Vancouver, near Victoria Drive and Venables Street, Gallacher can get around on a couple of forearm crutches.

But to leave Gallagher needs their motorized wheelchair to do everything from buy groceries to attend choir practice. 

“It completely changes my life,” Gallacher said, crying. “I can’t go do anything.” 

Gallacher says they submitted these photos to Vancouver police when this motorized wheelchair was stolen sometime between Friday night and Saturday morning. (Romham Gallacher)

Gallacher suffers from ankylosing spondylitis, a type of arthritis that affects the spine, and lives off of disability payments. Money to buy the wheelchair about a year ago came from a small inheritance when Gallacher’s parents died.

“I knew that I would be needing it for a long time and I wanted to get something that would really work for my body,” Gallacher said, adding that the lightweight, customized wheelchair fits better than mobility scooters they’ve used in the past. 

Buying a new one isn’t financially feasible. 

No questions asked

Gallacher says friends and community members have been helpful — putting up flyers, searching for the wheelchair and dropping by with groceries. Some have even offered to host a fundraiser. 

But until Gallacher can get their motorized wheelchair back, any sort of outing is put on hold. 

Gallacher says they hope the thief will return the wheelchair, no questions asked. 

“I have no desire to criminalize anyone over this,” they said. “I just need my legs back.”

 

 

1Oct

Ice Dream nightmare: hundreds of frozen vegan treats stolen from truck in Vancouver | CBC News

by admin

Someone somewhere in the Lower Mainland has a truckload of hot ice cream that Naomi Arnaut is desperate to get back.

That’s “hot” as in “stolen,” not “hot” as in “melted,” although it is conceivable the thousands of dollars in frozen treats burgled from Arnaut’s Say Hello Sweets ice cream truck did not survive the crime.

“I suspect that they targeted me and had a plan, because they were very efficient,” said Arnaut. “They got in there fast, got what they wanted and got out.”

The pink and white truck was hit Sunday night while parked on Industrial Avenue in East Vancouver.

Arnaut is asking people to be on the lookout for Ice Dream Sandwiches or Say Hello boxed cubes of ice cream that may appear to be in the wrong hands. (Say Hello Sweets)

Beside making off with over 100 Ice Dream Sandwiches and eight cases of boxed ice cream, thieves also ripped out the truck’s generator leaving behind extensive damage and smashed doors and windows.

On Facebook Arnaut is asking people to be on the lookout for anyone trying to fence treats from Say Hello Sweets.

“If you see Say Hello being sold somewhere that doesn’t quite seem right, please alert us ASAP!”

Arnaut is hoping a neighbouring business has security camera video of the crime. 

Vancouver Police confirm they are investigating.

Owner Naomi Arnaut and dog Babycakes in front of the Say Hello Sweets ice cream truck.

27Jun

Thousands of tabs of addictive opioids stolen from VGH last year

by admin

Over 2,000 doses of opiates were stolen from Vancouver General Hospital by staff last year, according to documents obtained through a freedom of information request.

Over 1,600 tabs and 853 millilitres of hydromorphone were reported stolen from the hospital in two unrelated incidents last January.

“The diversion or misuse of narcotics is rare,” spokesperson Matt Kieltyka explained in an email to Postmedia. “Vancouver Coastal Health takes this issue seriously and has several systems in place to ensure narcotics are dispensed and accounted for as prescribed.”

Kieltyka said staff were involved in both instances, but he was not able to give details on what disciplinary measures were taken.

Such theft, known as “drug diversion,” has been a rising concern in recent years.

Data from Health Canada shows 13,221 doses of opioids were reported stolen from medical facilities in 2018.

Over 3,200 of those were in B.C., which is more than any other province except Ontario, where over 9,700 were taken.

Theft of hydromorphone, which is sometimes sold under the name Dilaudid, jumped sharply in B.C. between 2017 and 2018, according to Health Canada data, with 3,211 units stolen in 2018 compared to just 12 the year before.

Mark Fan, a researcher at North York General Hospital who studies drug diversion, said data on stolen drugs is likely incomplete and that rates of diversion as “probably underestimated.”

“At any point in the medication use process, it’s possible for it to be transferred away from legitimate use,” said Fan.

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He said diversion usually occurs when a staff member manipulates documentation or falsifies prescriptions to over-order medication. They also may physically steal the substances.

In such cases, the theft may not be discovered until an audit is conducted.

Drug diversion made headlines in 2015 after a VGH aide overdosed on stolen opiates. Since then, Vancouver Coastal Health and the Provincial Health Services Authority have adopted measures that Kieltyka said include “dispensing machines, vaults, locked cabinets and security cameras.”

The authority says they have also piloted use of “containers that contain a solution that renders the drugs unusable” at two units within Vancouver Coastal Health and may implement them province-wide.

Const. Steve Addision with the Vancouver Police Department says hydromorphone is fairly common in the city’s illicit drug market, and that a 2-mg pill usually sells for around $10.

But the major driver of diversion is addiction.

Dr. Shimi Kang, an addictions psychiatrist who has worked with hospital staff involved in drug diversion, said workplace stress and access to potent opioids creates a “perfect storm” for substance use.

“We have to recognize that healthcare practitioners are human too,” she said.

She said nurses often face high levels of stress and violence in the workplace and that adequate sleep, time off and support are the best ways to prevent addiction.

“We get so caught up in being the healer that we forget to heal ourselves,” said Kang.

Dr. Mark Haden, a professor at the UBC School of Population and Public Health and a supervisor with the B.C. Centre on Substance Use, said it shows the indiscriminate nature of addiction.

“Being employed by the system does not protect one from addiction,” he said.

Hydromorphone is sometimes used in opiate-replacement therapy as a substitute for stronger street-level drugs. Last month, Canada became the first country in the world to approve use of injectable hydromorphone in treating opioid use disorder.

Haden said making the drug legally accessible could prevent thefts — and deaths.

“If hospital staff who are also addicted to opiates had (open) access to them, they wouldn’t steal them,” he said. “I think the solution to the fentanyl crisis and people stealing from hospitals is the same.”

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29May

SPCA promotes human-pet bond after dog stolen from Vancouver homeless man

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Dave M., a homeless man who didn’t want his last name used, says his Alaskan Eskimo dog Cutiepie was stolen on Granville Street. He’s holding a poster he is hoping will help him find his dog.


Mike Bell / PNG

The bond between humans and animals is so powerful that the mental and physical health of a pet owner can be lifted just by having their animal in their life, according to the SPCA.

Despite that, there is still some stigma toward pet ownership by people who are living on the streets, spokeswoman for the B.C. SPCA, Lorie Chortyk, said Wednesday.

The animal welfare organization is among the groups that work to support relationships between homeless people — many of whom have been through tough times in their lives — and their pets.

“Often for these individuals this is the first time they’ve ever experienced unconditional love,” Chortyk said.

“I think anyone who’s had a pet understands how powerful that bond is. But if you haven’t experienced that unconditional love, that bond is even stronger. And those individuals protect that animal and protect that bond even more.”


Dave M., a homeless man who didn’t want his last name used, says his Alaskan Eskimo dog Cutiepie was stolen on Granville Street. He’s holding a poster he is hoping will help him find his dog.

Mike Bell /

PNG

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Chortyk’s comments came a few days after a white American Eskimo dog named Cutiepie was stolen from a man living on the sidewalk out front of the Hudson’s Bay department store on Granville Street in Downtown Vancouver.

Dave M, who declined to give his full last name, said he had left Cutiepie with his belongings while he used the washroom around 2:30 p.m. Friday. When he returned, the dog was gone. A frantic search of the surrounding streets was fruitless.

Cutiepie has been in Dave’s life for about six years. He presumed the then-eight-year-old dog had been abandoned before she arrived at his house in Mission, he said.

Asked if he knew who might have taken his dog, Dave said: “I’ve heard a couple people say (to the dog) ‘we’re going to give you a good home’, like, maybe four walls and a roof. … but I spend 24 hours a day with my dog. I take care of her. She’s my baby.”


Dave M., a homeless man who didn’t want his last name used, says his Alaskan Eskimo dog Cutiepie was stolen on Granville Street.

Mike Bell /

PNG

Dave, who has lived on the street for the past eight months, described Cutiepie as looking like a polar bear, with white hair, short little legs, a small head and a fat body. She’s a calm dog who loved being petted and she would spend hours in his lap being groomed, he said.

Dave asked anyone who has seen Cutiepie to alert the SPCA or the VPD, with whom he said he has filed a police report.

The SPCA has a program to help people who live on the streets care for their pets, and in Chortyk’s experience, people in that situation tend to be “so dedicated” to that cause.

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“Certainly, we’ve met a lot of people who will go without food themselves in order to make sure that their pets are well taken care of,” she said.

Through its Charlie’s pet food bank initiative, the SPCA offers things like nail trims, training tips, veterinary care, surgeries and referrals, as well as food, toys, carriers and leashes. The program is open to donations.

If anyone is concerned about the well-being of any animal they can contact the SPCA at 1-855-622-7722, and the organization can send out a staff member to assess the situation. If needed, they can either take the animal into care or try to help the owner, Chortyk said.

Studies and surveys around the world have repeatedly shown the importance pets can have in the lives of street-involved people, according to a 2014 research review written by Emma Woolley in her capacity as a research assistant with the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness.

Woolley referenced a 2012 paper by Leslie Irvine, titled Animals as Lifechangers and Lifesavers: Pets in the Redemption Narratives of Homeless People, who conducted a series of interviews at pet clinics in the U.S. and found pets had led their owners to give up drugs, escape depression or even choose to continue living.

A Chihuahua was stolen from a panhandler around East Hastings and Nanaimo St. last year, according to CBC. The dog was later recovered by police after it was spotted by a good Samaritan.

Steve Addison, a VPD spokesman, encouraged anyone with information about a crime to call police. He said VPD did not have readily available data on the frequency of pets being stolen.

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28Feb

Bike stolen in Vancouver the very first time newcomer locked it outside

by admin

It was not the “welcome to Canada” moment that Mahshid Hadi was expecting.

The 27-year-old moved to Coqutilam from Turkey in December and the very first time she locked her bike in downtown Vancouver it was stolen.

“I didn’t bring any clothes with me – I just carried my bike with me,” Hadi said, explaining that her bike took up most of her 23-kilogram suitcase during the journey to Canada.

Originally from Iran, Hadi was a refugee in Turkey for more than four years.

Working as an ELS teacher, she said it took two years to save up enough money to buy the bike. Hadi said she would ride from one poor community to another – teaching kids how to ride it.

“This bike meant a lot to me because it carried so many stories with it,” Hadi said.

On Saturday, Feb. 23, Hadi had locked her bike on Homer Street in front of Westside Church, where she was volunteering at a film festival. When she came out it was gone.

“I was thinking, the world is gone from in front of my eyes,” Hadi said.

One security camera in the area recorded the moment two thieves approach her bike. According to the video, at 8:24 p.m. a man appears to cut her bike lock and ride away.

Another woman seen in the video follows the thief using a different bike.

“Bike thefts continue to be an issue in Vancouver and other cities around British Columbia,” explained Const. Jason Doucette with Vancouver Police.

Doucette said more than 2,000 bikes were stolen in the city in 2018.

Vancouver police recommend owners record the serial number on their bike, take a photo of the bike, and also take a photo of them with the bike.

“We recover many bikes that are stolen and we can’t link back to an owner and they end up going to auction and we don’t want to do that,” Doucette explained.

Meanwhile, Hadi is holding out hope someone will read her story and find it in their heart to return the bike.

Her message to the thief is, “This bike is much more than what you may think or imagine. It affects my life, it affects my future opportunities. I would like this bike back.”


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