Posts Tagged "Vancouver"

4Aug

Training for tech careers offered in Metro Vancouver

by admin

As many as 20 eligible British Columbians will get skill enhancement training and local work experience as IT help desk analysts to help them develop their careers in the tech industry.

This is a new Community and Employer Partnerships (CEP) project from the Government of British Columbia. Participant recruitment is focused on internationally trained professionals and individuals who want to pursue careers in tech, but have limited Canadian work experience.

“This Job Creation Partnership is a great example of a community-based project,” said Nicholas Simons, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction. “Participants will have the opportunity to advance their careers while providing IT and tech support to the community as part of their work experience.”

The Province is providing almost $300,000 to YWCA Metro Vancouver to deliver skills enhancement and work experience courses over two intakes of its YWCA TechLink program.

Participants will receive up to 20 weeks of work experience, at least two weeks of followup support to assist in their job search and an opportunity to participate in two networking events over the course of the project.

They will also receive professional certification as IBM customer engagement specialists, as well as training to reset and set up donated technology, format disk drives and install operating systems and malware protection.

“There are so many Metro Vancouver job seekers who have robust tech qualifications and experience, but struggle to find work because they’re internationally trained and lack local experience,” said Owen Stride, program manager, YWCA TechLink. “YWCA TechLink is a great opportunity, not only for these job seekers to develop local experience so that they can pursue their tech careers, but also for community members who need support accessing technology at a time when it’s needed more than ever. We’re grateful to be able to deliver this program with the support of the ministry.”

Funding for this project is provided through the Job Creation Partnership stream of WorkBC’s CEP. CEP’s investments are targeted toward projects that support an inclusive economic recovery. CEP supports B.C. job seekers’ training and work experience leading to employment in available jobs, and aids businesses and communities to address labour market challenges. CEP invests $15 million annually in communities throughout B.C.

“YWCA TechLink and its participants will be a valuable part of our economic recovery,” said Andrew Mercier, Parliamentary Secretary for Skills Training. “Not only is YWCA TechLink creating opportunity for trained job seekers to develop experience in B.C., the economy will benefit from this workforce for years to come. This is a great opportunity that benefits everyone in British Columbia.”

Full-time, group-based learning for the first intake of this project will start on Monday, Aug. 9, 2021. Project activities run until Jan. 14, 2022. Anyone interested in finding out more about this or other CEP projects can contact their local WorkBC centre.

Learn More:

Learn how CEPs are helping local communities:
www.workbc.ca/Employment-Services/Community-and-Employer-Partnerships.aspx

Learn about how WorkBC can help find British Columbians jobs that are right for them:
www.workbc.ca/rightforyou

Find your local WorkBC centre:
https://www.workbc.ca/Employment-Services/WorkBC-Centres/WorkBC-Centres-Listing.aspx

YWCA Metro Vancouver – YWCA TechLink: https://ywcavan.org/techlink

3Aug

Events in Metro Vancouver: Live and virtual things to do Aug. 5-11

by admin

This week’s events around Metro Vancouver include the Arts Club’s production of Beneath Springhill and the Vines Arts Festival.

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Whether you’re looking for date-night ideas, free things to do or just something fun to experience with the kids, you can’t go wrong with our list of events happening around Metro Vancouver between Aug. 5 and 11. Headlining this week’s picks is the Arts Club’s Beneath Springhill.

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For more ideas, click HERE for our coverage of Vancouver’s arts scene.

Here are five things to do in Metro this week:

Beneath Springhill: The Maurice Ruddick Story

When: Aug. 5-29

Where: Granville Island Stage

Tickets: From $39 at artsclub.com

The Arts Club’s latest one-person production tells the story of the African-Canadian “singing miner” Maurice Ruddick. Ruddick served as a lifeline for his fellow miners over nine days during the 1958 Springhill, N.S., mining disaster. Jeremiah Sparks stars in the play, which won the 2015 Dora Mavor Moore Award for Best New Play.

The Return of the Thunder Beings — pictured are Dae Shields and Kor Kase — celebrates Black life at this year’s Vines Art Festival, Aug. 9-19.
The Return of the Thunder Beings — pictured are Dae Shields and Kor Kase — celebrates Black life at this year’s Vines Art Festival, Aug. 9-19. Photo by Luciana Freire D’Anunciação /PNG

Vines Art Festival

When: Aug. 9-19

Where: Various locations and online

Info:vinesartfestival.com

The annual arts and land-justice festival returns to Vancouver parks with over 100 performing and visual artists. Some highlights include Reopening Ceremonies (Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. at Second Beach); the Vancouver Prison Justice Day Memorial (Aug. 10 at 6 p.m. beside the Claire Culhane Memorial Bench, southeast corner, Trout Lake Park); and Our Stories Embodied (Aug. 11 at 6 p.m. at New Brighton Park), which features an array of storytellers and artists.

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The Rickshaw streams a performance by Vancouver new wave/post-punk band Actors on Aug 6-8.
The Rickshaw streams a performance by Vancouver new wave/post-punk band Actors on Aug 6-8. Photo by Kira Clavell /PNG

Actors

When: Aug. 6-8

Where: Online

Tickets: $13.50 at eventbrite.ca

Since the release of their 2018 sophomore album, It Will Come to You, Vancouver’s Actors have followed up with a number of singles. These and other tracks are showcased in a set recorded live at the Rickshaw by the post-punk/new wave quartet. The stream precedes a tour scheduled to begin in San Diego on Sept 9.

Paula Nishikawara’s If I Lived in the Ocean is on at the Vancouver Maritime Museum until Oct 24.
Paula Nishikawara’s If I Lived in the Ocean is on at the Vancouver Maritime Museum until Oct 24. Photo by Daniel Campbell /PNG

Paula Nishikawara: If I Lived in the Ocean

Where: Vancouver Maritime Museum

When: Until Oct. 24

Info:vanmaritime.com

Artist Paula Nishikawara calls her new exhibit “a museum intervention.” The intervention is an immersive environment made with bamboo poles, jute sacks, kelp, waste plastics and traditional Japanese gyotaku art. Initially the museum approached Nishikawara to show her gyotaku prints, which are made using fish; Nishikawara proposed this instead to challenge audiences to examine their relationship with the ocean.

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A detail from part of Persimmon Blackbridge’s installation Constructed Identities, at the Pendulum Gallery until Aug. 20.
A detail from part of Persimmon Blackbridge’s installation Constructed Identities, at the Pendulum Gallery until Aug. 20. Photo by Pendulum Gallery /PNG

Persimmon Blackbridge: Constructed Identities

When: Until Aug. 20

Where: Pendulum Gallery

Info:pendulumgallery.bc.ca

In Persimmon Blackbridge’s new installation, figures created from carved wood and found objects question how disability is framed. According to the news release, the B.C. artist’s “exploration of the figure begins in disability, but necessarily complicates itself as our embodied identities intersect and overlap.” Blackbridge has written a number of books, including the 1997 novel Prozac Highway. Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture, a professional disability arts non-profit group, is the presenter.

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29Jul

17 ‘stranger attacks’ in just 2 weeks in Vancouver, police say, releasing video of an incident

by admin

VANCOUVER —
Officers are investigating an incident they say is just one of more than a dozen random assaults reported in Vancouver in the last few weeks.

Police said the incident was reported in the early morning hours of July 11, though the public was not notified until this week.

In a news release, the Vancouver Police Department said a man was walking home along Granville Street at about 3:30 a.m. that day when he was approached by a group of men.

Part of the incident was captured by a nearby security camera, according to the VPD, who released some of that video Thursday.

Police said the video shows a man pushed the victim down. Another helped the victim up, and the victim can be seen walking with the group toward a lane near Granville and Smithe Street.

The VPD said the victim was assaulted while in the lane, and his wallet was stolen.

And it does not appear to be an isolated incident.

According to VPD Const. Tania Visintin, “Stranger attacks have been prevalent in recent weeks throughout Vancouver and this is very concerning.”

The constable said there have been 17 “random assaults” reported across the city in the last two weeks alone.

Three suspects are all described as South Asian and in their early 20s.

The first is about 5’10” with short hair and “large ears,” the VPD said. At the time of the assault, he was wearing a white T-shirt, white pants and a green jacket, and carrying a black satchel across his chest.

Police described the second man as about 5’11” with a medium build and short dark hair. He was wearing a grey hooded sweater and black pants.

The third, according to police, is about 5’9″ with curly dark brown hair, and had on a white sweater and grey sweatpants the morning of July 11.

Police are seeking witnesses, as well as anyone who may recognize the men in the video.

“This happened around the time the bars closed on Granville Street. We know there were people still out and they may have seen what happened and can identify these men,” Visintin said.

“There is no excuse for anyone to get attacked for absolutely no reason.”

25Jul

Feds approve Vancouver psychedelics company’s trial use of ecstasy to treat PTSD

by admin

Numinus, which specializes in psychedelic research, will study MDMA-assisted therapy on 20 people

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A Vancouver psychedelics company has been granted approval from Health Canada to study MDMA-assisted therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Numinus, a company that advances treatments for mental health care based on psychedelic-assisted therapies, said the feasibility of using the drug commonly known as ecstasy is being studied in collaboration with MAPS Public Benefit Corporation (a subsidiary of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies).

“We are thrilled that Health Canada has issued its ‘no objection letter’ allowing this important study to proceed and, in doing so, potentially advance Canada toward a legal, regulated system for MDMA-assisted therapy,” said Payton Nyquvest, CEO of Numinus.

“At Numinus, we are focused on expanding patient access to psychedelic-assisted therapies such as MDMA for PTSD, and we are gratified that our study will provide safety and outcome data to regulators to support integration of this treatment into mainstream mental health care.”

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The company’s aim is healing depression, anxiety, trauma, pain and substance abuse, rather than managing their symptoms, he said.

Numinus will now seek about 20 volunteers to study the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted therapy. Ecstasy is a controlled substance and is illegal to use except for approved medical and scientific studies using medical-grade MDMA.

Participants in preliminary studies had PTSD diagnoses from a range of causes, including combat-related events, accidents, abuse, sexual harm and developmental trauma.

Those preliminary trials showed 88 per cent of participants who got three controlled and supervised MDMA-assisted therapy sessions experienced a clinically significant reduction in symptoms, with 67 per cent no longer qualifying for PTSD diagnosis, compared to 32 per cent of participants taking placebos, according to Dr. Devon Christie, medical and therapeutic services director at Numinus.

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“Health Canada should be recognized for its ongoing leadership through its support of this study,” Christie said. “At our Vancouver clinic, we have spent months establishing the physical, technical, clinical and human resource infrastructure needed to move the study forward and ultimately foster greater access to MDMA-assisted therapy.“

Those participating in the study will meet with therapists for a preparatory session and then a day-long drug session. Unlike preliminary trials, the participants will not be required to stay overnight.

gordmcintyre@postmedia.com

twitter.com/gordmcintyre

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22Jul

Popular sunset viewpoint in Vancouver now open to public drinking, with no toilets in place

by admin

Nearest public toilet to alcohol-friendly Volunteer Park is adjacent to a children’s playground.

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Alcohol in Parks Pilot signs are up at one of Vancouver’s most beloved sunset view parks, with no plans in place for needed washroom breaks.

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Volunteer Park is on Point Grey Road just west of the bottom of Macdonald Street in Kitsilano — opposite the home of a former B.C. premier and a few hundred metres east of Chip Wilson’s mansion.

The park is a regular gathering spot for evening picnickers as it offers stunning sunset views and leads to Volunteer Beach — giving the same view as the Point Grey Road waterfront residents.

However, the nearest washroom is several hundred metres to the south at Tatlow Park — across the road — and adjacent to a children’s playground.

In a statement, the parks board said there are no plans to install portable toilets at Volunteer Park.

“We carefully monitor and identify needs for each site through feedback from our staff, partners and the public,” the parks board said.

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Signs at the park ask users not to bring alcohol within 20 metres of a playground, to avoid large gatherings and practise social distancing of two metres between groups.

The Alcohol in Parks Pilot began in 22 parks across the city on July 12 and runs until Oct. 11. The project stemmed from the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, when drinkers were not allowed into bars.

Unlike many of the other 21 public parks in the drinking pilot, almost all of Volunteer Park has been set aside for drinking alcohol between 11 a.m. and 9 p.m.

Collingwood Park in Renfrew Heights has just the northeast corner and a row of trees accessible, while David Lam Park in Yaletown has set aside a strip along the waterfront, and only the north tip of Kitsilano Beach Park is open to drinking.

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Sgt. Steve Addison of the Vancouver Police Department said most of the recent challenges with public drinking had occurred outside the pilot parks.

“The majority of the challenges we’re facing involve people drinking alcohol in places that are not designated parks — places like beaches and in the entertainment districts,” Addison said in a statement.

“This has led to a significant amount of street disorder. We continue to encourage people to research where open alcohol is permitted, and to understand that they could be ticketed if they are drinking outside the designated places and times.”

Two months ago, the owner of a newly built home adjacent to the park and Volunteer Beach was forced to take down a spotlight on the beach that was triggered by people walking past or partying at night.

The parks board said it wants public input during the trial submitted by calling 311 or through its website.

dcarrigg@postmedia.com


CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email vantips@postmedia.com.

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Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

22Jul

Popular sunset view point in Vancouver now open to public drinking, with no toilets in place

by admin

Nearest public toilet to alcohol-friendly Volunteer Park is adjacent to a children’s playground.

Article content

Alcohol in Parks Pilot signage is up at one of Vancouver’s most beloved sunset view parks, with no plans in place for needed washroom breaks.

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Article content

Volunteer Park is on Point Grey Road just west of the bottom of Macdonald Street in Kitsilano – opposite the home of a former B.C. premier and a few hundred metres east of Chip Wilson’s manse.

The park is a regular gathering spot for evening picnicers as it offers stunning sunset views and leads to Volunteer Beach – giving the same view as the Point Grey Road waterfront residents.

However, the nearest washroom is several hundred metres away south at Tatlow Park – across the road – and adjacent to a children’s playground.

In a prepared statement, the parks board said there were no plans to install portable toilets at Volunteer Park.

“We carefully monitor and identify needs for each site through feedback from our staff, partners and the public,” parks board said.

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Signage at the park asks users not to bring alcohol within 20 metres of a playground, to avoid large gatherings and practice social distancing of two metres between groups.

The Alcohol in Parks Pilot began in 22 parks across the city on July 12 and runs until Oct. 11. The project stemmed from the COVID-19 pandemic – when drinkers were not allowed in to bars.

Unlike many of the other 21 public parks in park board’s drinking pilot, almost all of Volunteer Park has been set aside for drinking alcohol between 11 a.m. and 9 p.m.

Collingwood Park in Renfrew Heights has just the north-east corner and a row of trees accessible, while David Lam Park in Yaletown has set aside a strip along the waterfront and just the north tip of Kitsilano Beach Park is open to drinking.

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Vancouver Police Department spokesperson Sgt. Steve Addison said most of the recent challenges with public drinking had occurred outside the pilot parks.

“The majority of the challenges we’re facing involve people drinking alcohol in places that are not designated parks – places like beaches and in the entertainment districts,” Addison said in a prepared statement.

“This has led to a significant amount of street disorder. We continue to encourage people to research where open alcohol is permitted, and to understand that they could be ticketed if they are drinking outside the designated places and times.”

Two months ago the owner of the newly-built home adjacent to the park and Volunteer Beach was forced to take down a spotlight on the beach that was triggered by people walking past or partying at night.

Parks board said it wants public input during the trial submitted by calling 311 or through its website.

dcarrigg@postmedia.com

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Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

11Jul

Cycling across Canada for the homeless was worth it for Vancouver duo

by admin

“What really helped was knowing it was for a cause, that me not giving up would help others have something to eat — it was something bigger than myself.” — Osa Hawthorne

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Vancouverites Keenan Macartney and Osa Hawthorne faced black flies, bears, semi-trucks, injuries, loneliness and a deadly heat dome biking across Canada, but never gave up.

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The duo, who have raised nearly $13,000 for Vancouver’s CityReach Care Society, said that knowing they were raising money for a good cause helped keep them going on their cross-country trek.

Macartney has volunteered for CityReach’s Club Freedom, a soup kitchen which provides food, prepared meals and recovery services to low-income families, since he was 13. He wanted to find a way to do more.

He and Osa are best friends, inseparable since the age of nine, and accustomed to doing adventurous things together: skydiving or hiking the west coast trail or, when they were kids, longboarding the hills in the West Van neighbourhood where they grew up. Note to kids reading this: longboarding is not allowed on the streets of West Van.

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How hard could it be to cycle across Canada? Very hard, as it turns out.

“We are ambitious and naive,” said Macartney.

Osa Hawthorne and Keenan Macartney biked across Canada to raise funds for the homeless in Vancouver.
Osa Hawthorne and Keenan Macartney biked across Canada to raise funds for the homeless in Vancouver. Photo by photo submitted /submitted

The friends started their journey in Quebec City on June 1 as COVID-19 restrictions prevented them from starting in the Maritimes. Each carried 20-30 pounds of gear in three panniers, including tents, sleeping bags, cookware, food, water and a couple of pairs of bike shorts.

Echelon Wealth management signed on as a sponsor, pledging to match the first $1,000 raised, Landyachtz Bike store, donated the wheels: a sturdy cross between a road bike and a gravel bike.

Their plan was to cover 180 km a day, unsupported, riding on the road or on the shoulder of the Trans Canada highway. They soon discovered that sometimes there is no shoulder on the highway. They had to ride on the white line in the far right travelling lane while semi-trucks barrelled past with alarming frequency. One, carrying an excavator, roared past so close that Macartney could feel the excavator’s blades whistle past his head.

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“I’ve never felt anything more terrifying than the draft of air that shoots up and pushes you around as the semi goes by, the blades of the excavator inches away,” said Macartney.

The duo were only about 500 km into the journey, still trying to figure out how to deal with the trucks and SUVS, to learn when to hold the line, and when to ditch in the gravel, when Macartney’s knees gave in to a painful tendon injury and he had to take a break for about a week.

Oso was left on his own to cross the long, desolate stretch north of Lake Superior.

“Being by myself was the hardest part. I was by myself for about seven days, no cellphone reception, totally isolated,” said Oso.

He battled on, through swarms of black flies, and, one night while camping under a bridge, he had a sleepless night listening to the heavy breathing of a bear outside his tent.

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Oso wondered, briefly, whether he should pack it in.

“It’s very, very uncomfortable being in the saddle eight to 12 hours a day,” said Oso. “But what really helped was knowing it was for a cause, that me not giving up would help others have something to eat — it was something bigger than myself.”

The kindness of strangers who bought meals, shared water and offered showers and encouragement, helped.

Macartney was able to rejoin the ride after getting treatment for his knee, and the pair sailed through the Prairies, survived a heat wave in Alberta, made it through the Rocky Mountains, and finally, on Saturday, arrived in Victoria.

To donate or learn more about the journey, go to ko-canada.com

dryan@postmedia.com

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Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

7Jul

Vancouver to allow booze in 22 city parks starting Monday

by admin

Starting next Monday, it will be legal to crack a cold one in designated parts of certain parks in the City of Vancouver.

The Vancouver Park Board has announced the details of its alcohol in parks pilot project, which will permit the consumption of alcoholic beverages in 22 city parks.

Read more:
Vancouver Park Board votes to allow drinking in 22 public parks, but legislation still needed

The board initially approved the plan last July, but the initiative was delayed because of the need for provincial legislative changes.

Under the pilot plan, people will be allowed to have a drink between 11 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily, until Oct. 11.

Drinks will only be permitted in specific parts of the parks, which will be marked with signage. You can see maps showing which part of the parks will permit alcohol here.

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The city says the parks were chosen in an effort to include one or two parks in every neighbourhood.

Read more:
North Vancouver to allow public drinking under COVID-19, but not Vancouver

Emergency vehicle access, washroom facilities, cycling and transit access, parking and potential disruptions to neighbours were also considerations, it said.

The city says the pilot is an effort to create more outdoor spaces for people to socialize, particularly those who do not have a private yard, and in recognition of COVID-19 safety concerns.

North Vancouver and Port Coquitlam both rolled out drinking in parks pilot projects last summer, and have reported minimal problems associated with the initiatives.

Read more:
Port Coquitlam, North Vancouver mayors give drinking in parks a gold star

Last year, the City of Vancouver also approved a plan that allows alcohol consumption in select public plazas.

Vancouver’s pilot project will apply to the following parks.

  • Collingwood Park
  • David Lam Park
  • Fraser River Park
  • Granville Park
  • Harbour Green Park
  • John Hendry (Trout Lake) Park
  • Kitsilano Beach Park / Hadden Park
  • Langara Park
  • Locarno Beach Park
  • Maple Grove Park
  • Memorial South Park
  • Memorial West Park
  • New Brighton Park
  • Pandora Park
  • Queen Elizabeth Park
  • Quilchena Park
  • Riverfront Park
  • Robson Park
  • Rupert Park
  • Stanley Park
  • Vanier Park
  • Volunteer Park




© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

27Jun

B.C. heat wave update for Jun 27: Fraser Health moves vaccination clinics indoors | Metro Vancouver issues poor air quality advisory | B.C. Hydro reports extreme energy demand

by admin

Here’s a roundup of the latest news concerning what Environment and Climate Change Canada is calling a “dangerous long duration heat wave.”

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Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley are in for a potentially record-breaking heat wave this weekend, with temperatures expected to hit the high 30s and even into the 40s in some areas.

It’s unprecedented hot weather for this region.

Authorities are urging residents to drink lots of water and check on elderly neighbours, and of course never leave a child or a pet in a parked car.

Here’s a roundup of the latest news concerning what Environment and Climate Change Canada is calling a “dangerous long duration heat wave.”


Read more:

Temperature records broken during heat wave in B.C. on Monday

Environment Canada issues heat warnings, says record-high temperatures loom for B.C.

B.C. Hydro says it will weather heat wave, customers won’t see outages like in some U.S. states

Extreme ‘dome of heat’ to descend on Metro Vancouver this weekend


LATEST NEWS on B.C.’s heat wave

SATURDAY

8:45 p.m. Fraser Health shifts vaccination clinics indoors

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Because of the excessive heat in the coming days, Fraser Health has taken the precaution of changing venues for those vaccination clinics that were to have been held outdoors.

Beginning Sunday, anyone going for testing or an immunization after noon will be redirected to a cooler indoor venue. The switches will be in place through Monday, at which point Fraser Health will provide an update on the situation.

Here’s a list of the affected clinics and the alternative locations:

• Burnaby COVID-19 Testing and Immunization Centre: Visit Christine Sinclair Community Centre instead

• Mission COVID-19 Testing and Immunization Centre: Visit Chilliwack Mall instead

• South Surrey COVID-19 Testing and Immunization Centre: Visit South Surrey Recreation Centre instead

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• Coquitlam COVID-19 Testing and Immunization Centre: Visit Haney Place Mall instead

• Langley COVID-19 Testing and Immunization Centre: Visit Langley Events Centre instead

• Surrey 66 COVID-19 Testing and Immunization Centre: Visit Cloverdale Recreation Centre instead

• Abbotsford Ag-Rec Centre Immunization Clinic: Visit Gateway Church instead.

5:45 p.m. The City of Maple Ridge has opened a cooling centre for temporary relief from the heat

The City of Maple Ridge has temporarily opened the Greg Moore Youth Centre as a cooling centre to provide residents with relief from the heat.

The centre is located at 11925 Haney Place in Maple Ridge with the entrance opposite to the north entrance of Haney Place Mall and will remain open until Monday. Additional days may be added as this weather system moves through the region.

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This site will be staffed by City employees, Emergency Support Services volunteers and security personnel who will be providing guests to the facility with bottled water, washroom access and seating to provide some comfort from the heat.

The city will continue the spray parks that were activated on the May long weekend in its two largest parks, Maple Ridge Park and Albion Sports Complex. Small water spray features will also be located at some other parks. The City’s Parks teams have also reactivated the water fountains in downtown parks, which were previously closed down due to COVID-19 protocols.

3:30 p.m. Metro Vancouver issues poor air quality advisory

Metro Vancouver has issued an air quality advisory for eastern Metro Vancouver and the central Fraser Valley because of high concentrations of ground-level ozone.

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High concentrations are expected to persist for a few days during the hot and sunny weather. The current weather forecast indicates extremely hot temperatures through at least Monday, the region said.

Metro said ground-level ozone is not emitted directly into the air. It is formed when nitrogen oxides (pollutants emitted when fuels are burned) and volatile organic compounds (emitted from solvents and other sources) react in the air in the presence of sunlight.

The highest levels of ground-level ozone are generally observed between mid-afternoon and early evening on summer days.

Residents are advised to avoid strenuous outdoor activities during mid-afternoon to early evening, when ozone levels are highest, especially if breathing feels uncomfortable.

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Exposure is particularly a concern for people with underlying illnesses and for those who are socially marginalized, such as people experiencing homelessness.

1 p.m. – B.C. Hydro says extreme heat causes record energy demand

B.C. Hydro says on Friday night the peak hourly demand record for June — the hour customers use the most power — was broken for a second time this week.

B.C. Hydro expects demand for power to continue to increase this weekend and it will likely peak on Monday – the day when temperatures are expected to hit 40ºC or higher in some parts of the province.

The last summer record was set on August 18, 2020 when peak hourly demand reached about 7,900 megawatts. Monday’s peak hourly demand could reach up to 8,300 megawatts, shattering the previous record, Hydro said.

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B.C. Hydro continues to insist it can meet the additional demand. It has also taken important steps to protect the safety of its customers and employees, including canceling the majority of planned outages as well as suspending disconnections for non-payment.

B.C. Hydro is providing some tips to save energy:

• Closing the drapes and blinds: Shading windows can block out up to 65 per cent of the heat.

• Shutting doors and windows: If the temperature outside is warmer than inside, keep doors and windows closed to keep the cooler air in and the warm air out.

• Using a fan: Running a fan nine hours a day over the summer costs just $7.

• Being a star: Purchase an Energy Star air conditioner as they use about 30 to 40 per cent less power than standard units.

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• Opting for smaller appliances: Use a microwave, crockpot or toaster oven to avoid the extra heat produced by larger appliances when preparing meals.

11:30 a.m. – Mission School District closes schools on Monday because of heat wave.

Mission schools will be closed on Monday because of the heat wave, as temperatures around 40 C are expected. The school district said it will reopen on Tuesday.

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11 a.m. – Fraser Health rebooks vaccines because of heat wave

Due to the extreme heat wave that is currently affecting Abbotsford and other areas of B.C., Fraser Health is rebooking COVID-19 vaccine appointments at the Abbotsford Ag-Rec Centre that were scheduled for 1 p.m. or later today.

The heat wave is causing elevated internal temperatures in the clinic and, as a result, Fraser Health says it has made the decision to rebook these appointments to protect the health and safety of staff and clients.

People who have been affected by this temporary measure are asked to call 1-833-838-2323 to rebook their appointment.

Alternatively, people may walk-in to another location.

9:30 a.m. – Heat dome primer

Environment Canada meteorologist Bobby Sekhon explains the phenomenon and what to expect in British Columbia.

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What is a heat dome?

A heat dome is caused by a strong ridge of high pressure that traps warm air underneath it. Although not a term commonly used by Environment Canada scientists, the heat dome gets its name because the ridge acts like a dome, allowing the sun to crank up the heat below and create a heat wave that lasts at least a few days.

How often does this happen?

Ridges of high pressure create hot spells in B.C. most years but they typically occur in July or August. Another memorable heat wave occurred in July 2009, when there were several heat-related fatalities and some B.C. weather stations smashed temperatures records. On July 30, 2009, the Vancouver airport set its current local record of 34.4 C.

How significant is this?

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This year’s ridge is much stronger and earlier than usual. The temperatures for this time of year are unprecedented and parts of B.C. are going to set some all-time records, certainly a lot of June records and probably daily maximum records.

Are there particular parts of B.C. you’re keeping an eye on?

The whole province is pretty much under heat warnings, except for parts of the northwest near the Yukon border and some coastal areas like West Vancouver Island up to Haida Gwaii. Some of the hot spots will be places like Lytton, Osoyoos, Port Alberni on Vancouver Island, Chilliwack in the Fraser Valley and Prince George in the north. Environment Canada is forecasting six days of 40-plus temperatures in Kamloops, which has never seen 40 C in June on record.

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How does a heat dome go away?

Eventually there will be a ridge breakdown, when the province transitions to cooler weather. Usually that is accompanied with thunderstorms because of built-up energy from the heat. Once the province gets some destabilization of the atmosphere and some troughs coming in, that usually kick-starts some convection and thunderstorms. If accompanying rain showers are limited, that can create a high risk of wildfires.

— Canadian Press

7 a.m. – Unusual heat wave will set records in Pacific Northwest

Heavy rain in China, an expanse of warm water stretching across the North Pacific, and kinks in the jet stream are combining to drive an unusual heat wave that will set records in the Pacific Northwest.

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Seattle and Portland may post their hottest June days in history, while heat warnings are posted in Canada as far north as the Arctic Circle. The dangerously hot temperatures raise wildfire risk, may worsen air pollution, and pose public health threats in a region where many don’t have air conditioning.

The warmth is building under a so-called heat dome that may have been exacerbated by climate change. It’s similar to the weather pattern earlier this month that led to a California heat wave, according to Jeff Masters, a meteorologist with Yale Climate Connections. Kinks in the jet stream have pinned summer weather in place leading to prolonged heat waves and drought, as well as storminess and flooding.

“The unusual waviness of the jet stream was associated with a pattern we have been seeing more often in summer, which has been connected to human-caused climate change,” Masters said.

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The current heat wave over the Northwest started with flooding rains across China on June 23, said Masters. That fed energy into the jet stream across the North Pacific, making it stronger than usual and setting off a chain reaction of weather patterns that led to the high pressure ridge building over western North America and driving temperatures up in the U.S. and Canada.

The heat, as well as the conditions that have caused widespread drought across the U.S. West, may have been made worse by warm water stretching across the North Pacific, as well as parts of the Bering and Chukchi seas near Alaska, said Jennifer Francis, a senior scientist at the Woodwell Climate Center. That pattern may have been exacerbated by less sea ice in the Arctic this year, a situation made worse in recent decades by climate change.

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The worst heat will center on the Northwest and then seep east into Idaho by Monday, though California will also see oppressive conditions. The Golden State’s power grid manager said it’s closely watching the situation. Excessive heat warnings cover areas east of Los Angeles, where temperatures could reach 110 F (43ºC) Sunday and Monday, and other parts of the state.

– Bloomberg


FRIDAY

5:30 p.m. – COVID-19 protocols takes back seat during a heat wave

B.C. medical health officers say people should be able to access cooling centres during the ongoing heat wave, even if there are concerns about crowding or physical distancing.

They also said people wearing masks who have difficulty breathing should remove the mask, whether indoors or outdoors.

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High temperatures are associated with an increase in deaths in the Lower Mainland, said Vancouver Coastal Health, Fraser Health, and Interior Health.

Especially vulnerable are the young, elderly, those working or exercising in the heat. People with chronic heart and lung conditions, people with mental illness, people living alone, and homeless people are also at high risk.

3:30 p.m. – Environment Canada issues heat warning across B.C. 

Environment Canada issued a slew of heat warnings across B.C. including Metro Vancouver due to a “dangerous long duration heat wave” starting Friday until at least Tuesday.

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Record-breaking temperatures are likely, with daytime highs expected to hit 29 to 38 C. There will be little respite at night as overnight lows will only dip down to 18 to 21 C.

With humidity, it could feel like the high 30’s and low 40’s, warned the federal weather agency.

2:30 p.m. – English Bay beach closed to swimmers due to high E. coli levels

If you’re looking to cool down from the heatwave with a dip in the ocean, don’t do it at English Bay beach.

The popular downtown Vancouver beach is temporarily off limits to swimmers Friday afternoon after high levels of E. coli was found in the water.

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Swimming in waters with high levels of the bacteria may increase the risk of gastrointestinal illness and skin and eye infections, said Vancouver Coastal Health.

— Cheryl Chan

8:20 a.m. – Here are 15 ways to beat the heat and stay cool

It’s finally summer, and B.C. is kicking it off with a long-lasting heat wave expected to hit Friday and linger until next week.

Temperatures are forecast to hit highs of 29 to 38ºC. With humidity, it could feel like the low 40s.

Such extreme heat isn’t something we’re used to. But don’t sweat it. Here are some heat wave hacks to help you cool down when the temperature rises.

— Cheryl Chan

8 a.m. – B.C.’s Ministry of Public Safety issues tips to stay safe, cool during extreme heat wave

British Columbians are being asked to take precautions this weekend, as Environment Canada predicts a dangerous, long heat wave beginning Friday and lasting until at least Wednesday.

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HealthLink BC has these tips for keeping cool and healthy:

• Never leave children alone in a parked car. Temperatures can rise to 52ºC within 20 minutes inside a vehicle when the outside temperature is 34ºC. Leaving the car windows slightly open will not keep the inside of the vehicle at a safe temperature.

• Drink plenty of fluids. Drink extra water even before you feel thirsty and if you are active on a hot day. Ask your health-care provider about how much water you should drink on hot days if you are on water pills or limiting your fluid intake.

• Keep cool. Stay indoors in air-conditioned buildings or take a cool bath or shower. At temperatures above 30ºC, fans alone may not be able to prevent heat-related illness. Sunscreen will protect against the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, but not from the heat.

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• Plan activity before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., when the sun’s UV radiation is the weakest.

• Avoid tiring work or exercise in hot, humid environments. If you must work or exercise, drink two to four glasses of non-alcoholic fluids each hour. Rest breaks are important and should be taken in the shade.

• Avoid sunburn. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher on exposed skin and an SPF 30 lip balm, and reapply often.

• Wear lightweight, light-coloured, loose-fitting clothing and a wide brimmed hat, or use an umbrella for shade.

• Regularly check older adults, children and others for signs of heat-related illness, and make sure they are keeping cool and drinking plenty of fluids.

• Check on those who are unable to leave their homes and people with emotional or mental-health challenges whose judgment may be impaired.

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• Heat also affects pets. Never leave a pet in a parked car. Limit pets’ exercise, and be sure to provide them with plenty of water and shade.

• Home treatment for mild heat exhaustion may include: Moving to a cooler environment; drinking plenty of cool, non-alcoholic fluids; resting; and taking a cool shower or bath.

If symptoms are not mild, last longer than one hour, change, worsen or cause concern, contact a health-care provider.

Elevated heat also increases the risk of wildfire, and British Columbians are being urged to do their part to prevent human-caused wildfires and help keep communities safe. To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call 1 800 663-5555 toll-free or *5555 on a cellphone.

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8 a.m. – B.C. Ferries reminds travellers to bring water

B.C. Ferries is reminding travellers this weekend to bring extra water because of the heat wave.

B.C. Ferries anticipates higher volumes of traffic, and the terminal is unable to offer facilities while waiting to enter the ticket booth.

THURSDAY

Environment Canada issues heat warnings, says record-high temperatures loom for B.C.

Jeremy Cain spent Thursday overseeing a team of outreach workers in Kamloops in a race against an impending heat wave that he worries will put the city’s already vulnerable community members at even greater risk.

Their cars are loaded with water bottles and sunscreen that they plan to distribute around the city over the next week with temperatures set to soar to 40 C and beyond by Saturday as part of a near-provincewide heat wave.

“I’ve lived in this community my whole life and the temperatures they’re calling for are alarming to any person in the general public, these are extreme temperatures where anyone can come to harm,” said Cain, who is director of outreach and clinical support services for the ASK Wellness Society.

— The Canadian Press


TOO HOT TO TWEET

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26Jun

All-season PNE amphitheatre upgrade approved by Vancouver council

by admin

The business case is strong with full payback of city-fronted capital, but what can’t be quantified are the priceless experiences and memories that will be created for new generations of music lovers.” — Sarah Kirby-Yung

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The Pacific National Exhibition’s amphitheatre will get a major facelift, after council directed staff this week to upgrade the venue to allow for expanded capacity and year-round operation.

The amphitheatre renewal project, which council approved unanimously, will feature a covered stage, floor and bleachers, allowing the venue to host concerts through the rainy months.

The total PNE amphitheatre project is estimated to cost $64.8 million over the next five years. At Wednesday’s meeting, council approved city staff’s request for $6 million for planning, design and preliminary infrastructure upgrades associated with the amphitheatre project, as well as another $1.1 million for other infrastructure renewal at the Hastings Park site.

The upgrade will expand venue capacity from 7,000 to 9,340, seeking to “fill a major gap in the local venue market,” a city staff report says, and increase the number of events outside the annual PNE Fair from five to 49, boosting annual revenue from $1.4 million to an estimated $9.7 million. The project is forecast to pay for itself within 12 years.

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Over the last six decades, the existing amphitheatre has hosted touring acts like Hall and Oates, and local legends like Doug and The Slugs. But, the report says, the open-air concert venue is “is now in poor condition and no longer meets the needs of performers, artists and guests. … The venue includes out-of-date concession areas, limited washrooms, and poor accessibility for guests, hindering the venue’s ability to leverage the space to its potential.”

The upgrade will also introduce permanent back-of-house infrastructure and improved guest amenities.

The Pacific National Exhibition’s amphitheatre will get a major facelift, after council directed staff this week to upgrade the venue to allow for expanded capacity and year-round operation.
The Pacific National Exhibition’s amphitheatre will get a major facelift, after council directed staff this week to upgrade the venue to allow for expanded capacity and year-round operation. Photo by Jason Payne /PNG

In a city press release, OneCity Coun. Christine Boyle called the amphitheatre project “a public investment that will benefit Vancouver for decades to come.”

Independent Coun. Sarah Kirby-Yung said: “Seeing concerts and shows at the Amphitheatre is quintessentially Vancouver. … The business case is strong with full payback of city-fronted capital, but what can’t be quantified are the priceless experiences and memories that will be created for new generations of music lovers.”

Kirby-Yung asked staff to endeavour to expedite the project, aiming to have the venue operational earlier than the original 2026 completion date.

dfumano@postmedia.com

twitter.com/fumano

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

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